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Ten Commandments

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WHAT THE BIBLE SAYS ABOUT THE TEN COMMANDMENTS

by Betty Miller

INTRODUCTION

What importance is there for a Christian, or anyone else, to know the Ten Commandments? How much validity and relevance can they have in our lives today? Does God expect us to follow them? Will we go to Hell if we do not keep them? Are these Laws for everyone, or are they only for those who hold the Old Testament as sacred?


If you have ever asked these questions, we think that you will be blessed by this in-depth look at the Ten Commandments. How did they come about? The Ten Commandments are the 10 basic laws that God commanded Israel to obey in the Old Testament. The laws were given to Moses by God, Himself. Moses was called of God to go up into a mountain and there God gave him these commandments so he could return and give them to the Israelites. They were written in tablets of stone by the finger of God. The story is recorded in Exodus 24:12-13:

12 And the LORD said unto Moses, Come up to me into the mount, and be there: and I will give thee tables of stone, and a law, and commandments which I have written; that thou mayest teach them.
13 And Moses rose up, and his minister Joshua: and Moses went up into the mount of God.


Here are the Ten Commandments that God spoke and wrote for Moses to give to His people:

The Ten Commandments (KJV)
Exodus 20:1-17

1 And God spake all these words, saying,
2 I am the LORD thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.
3 Thou shalt have no other gods before me.
4 Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth:
5 Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
6 And showing mercy unto thousands of them that love me, and keep my commandments.
7 Thou shalt not take the name of the LORD thy God in vain; for the LORD will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain.
8 Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy.
9 Six days shalt thou labour, and do all thy work:
10 But the seventh day is the sabbath of the LORD thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates:
11 For in six days the LORD made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day: wherefore the LORD blessed the sabbath day, and hallowed it.
12 Honour thy father and thy mother: that thy days may be long upon the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee.
13 Thou shalt not kill.
14 Thou shalt not commit adultery.
15 Thou shalt not steal.
16 Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour.
17 Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour's house, thou shalt not covet thy neighbour's wife, nor his manservant, nor his maidservant, nor his ox, nor his ass, nor any thing that is thy neighbour's.


Condensed they would read as follows:

Number 1: Thou Shalt Have No Other Gods Beside Me
Number 2: Thou Shalt Not Worship Any Graven Images
Number 3: Thou Shalt Not Take the Name of the Lord Thy God in Vain
Number 4: Remember the Sabbath Day to Rest and Keep it Holy
Number 5: Honor Thy Father and Thy Mother
Number 6: Thou Shalt Not Kill
Number 7: Thou Shalt Not Commit Adultery
Number 8: Thou Shalt Not Steal
Number 9: Thou Shalt Not Bear False Witness
Number 10: Thou Shalt Not Covet Anything That is Thy Neighbor's

The Ten Commandments Offer Guidance

Psalm 119:104-105 says, "Through thy precepts I get understanding: therefore I hate every false way. Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path."

If we want holy guidance we must study the word of God and find out what God has to say about life and human experience, so that we can be guided by His Word. Neither my opinion, nor anyone else's opinions are sufficient to solve the problems of humanity. The answers can only be found in God's Word. He is the creator of all things, and He has the answers for His creation. He is the Judge and final authority on every subject.

By keeping His Word and His commandments we will not stumble, but will have light on our pathway of life; therefore, we should make it a priority to understand His ways. If you do not know the Ten Commandments, you are among a big company. Recent statistics state that the average Christian scored very low when tested for knowledge of the Ten Commandments. Most of us do not know the Ten Commandments, and many cannot even name three of them. That's really a sad commentary for Christians.

The 10 Commandments are the 10 basic laws that God commanded Israel to obey in the Old Testament. Since all believers in Christ make up "spiritual Israel," these laws are still valid for us to live by. Some people think that these precepts do not apply to Christians today as they are the Old Testament law. I have heard people make this statement, "Well that's the old law, we don't have to keep the old law." The Bible teaches that the Old Testament law is the foundation for the New Testament commandments.

We actually are called to keep a higher law under the new covenant. In the Old Testament they were judged on their deeds and their actions. The New Testament we are judged by what goes on in our hearts. The Bible deals all the way through the New Testament about what goes on in the heart of man. Jesus dealt with the heart attitudes of men. He always put His finger right on the motives of men. In the Old Testament men were commanded not to commit murder. In the New Testament the Bible tells us if we have hatred in our hearts for a brother we are guilty of murder even if we do not commit the actual deed.

1 John 3:15 says, "Whosoever hateth his brother is a murderer: and ye know that no murderer hath eternal life abiding in him."

God's Commandments Are Life to Us

Let us see what the Bible says about the importance of knowing and keeping God’s laws.

"Hear, ye children, the instruction of a father, and attend to know understanding. For I give you good doctrine, forsake ye not my law.... Hear, O my son, and receive my sayings; and the years of thy life shall be many. I have taught thee in the way of wisdom; I have led thee in right paths.... My son, attend to my words; incline thine ear unto my sayings. Let them not depart from thine eyes; keep them in the midst of thine heart. For they are life unto those that find them, and health to all their flesh. Keep thy heart with all diligence; for out of it are the issues of life" (Proverbs 4:1-2, 10-11, 20-23).

In above verse, the Lord instructs us to "attend to" or to "pay attention" to His words. The commandments of God are His Words to us. They are life! The Bible says if we put God's Word into our hearts it will produce the blessings of life.

In computer language we understand the expression, GIGO (Garbage In, Garbage Out). If we put garbage into our spirits, that is what will come out. Likewise, if we fill our heart with the good things of the Spirit, that is also what will come out. Spiritually, as well as physically, "we are what we eat!"

What did Jesus say about the Law?

In Matthew 12:34-37, Jesus lays out an important principle. Speaking to the Pharisees, He says:"O generation of vipers, how can ye, being evil, speak good things? for out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaketh. A good man out of the good treasure of the heart bringeth forth good things: and an evil man out of the evil treasure bringeth forth evil things. But I say unto you that every idle word that men shall speak they shall give account thereof in the day of judgment. For by their words they shall be justified and by their words they shall be condemned."

Jesus said that we will either be justified or condemned by the words that we speak. Therefore, it is extremely important that we watch what comes out of our mouths. God wants His words of life and truth to come out of our spirit. For this to happen, however, we must read, study and receive the Word of God in our hearts. It can only come out of our hearts, if it has been planted there! If we do not take the time to study and know His commandments and His words, they will not come forth in our life.

"Think not that I am come to destroy the law, or the prophets: I am not come to destroy, but to fulfil. For verily I say unto you, Till heaven and earth pass, one jot or one tittle shall in no wise pass from the law, till all be fulfilled. Whosoever therefore shall break one of these least commandments, and shall teach men so, he shall be called the least in the kingdom of heaven: but whosoever shall do and teach them, the same shall be called great in the kingdom of heaven" (Matthew 5:17-19).

The Ten Commandments Influence in Society and Culture

God is doing many wonderful things in this hour; however, Satan is countering with his deception and counterfeits. Our world is becoming more volatile and changes are occurring rapidly. There are huge waves of satanic corruption coming against our culture. All over the world, we are faced with demonic filth that is paraded before us with very little shame.

A recent statistic, at the time of this writing, showed that in the United States, a crime is committed every three seconds and a murder is committed every half hour. Millions of children are victimized by kiddie pornography. There are hundreds of magazine titles dealing with child pornography, let alone the filth that is available through the Internet. Every year, there are a quarter of a million child abuse victims. An estimated ten per cent of the U.S. population is addicted to cocaine. There are millions of alcoholics in the U.S., and thousands of people die on our highways each year because of liquor, not to mention the other alcohol related deaths. Teen suicide and pregnancy are major problems as well as sexual abuse and rape. Millions of women around the world will be sexually abused this year.

I share the above statistics because there are some people who believe that the Ten Commandments are out of date, and are not relevant for today. If the Ten Commandments had been kept, we wouldn't have committed these sins in our nation and there would be no statistics to report such as this. Therefore, the Ten Commandments are not out of date today. They are very much in date and are needed today so that healing and wholeness can come to our world.

Two Parts to the Ten Commandments

The Ten Commandments are actually broken up into two basic sections. The first four commandments deal specifically with our relationship with God. The last six commandments deal with our relationship with other human beings. It is important to note that the commandments that focus on God come first. If we keep the first four commandments, the next six will be easier to keep as well. Much of the world focuses on keeping the last six commandments; and they believe that because they are leading a "moral" life, they are acceptable before God. Treating our fellow man in a righteous manner is extremely important to God. However, the first four commandments are more important than the last six. They are the foundation of the law. God wants us to treat each other as we ourselves would like to be treated. However, we can only do that to the extent that we are like God, and we are only like Him to the extent that we know Him and love Him. The knowledge and love of Him is obtained through keeping the first four commandments.

In the time of Christ, there was much discussion in Israel about the law and how to fulfill it. Jesus made the answer very simple by focusing on two verses from the Old Testament that sum up the entire law.

"Jesus said unto him, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets" (Matthew 22:37-40).

Jesus’ answer was based on two scriptures from the Old Testament: Deuteronomy 6:5 and Leviticus 19:18. According to Jesus, these are the verses that summed up the whole of the Law.

The first command deals with our relationship with God and second command deals with our relationship with others. Therefore we might say that the first four commandments are summed in the phrase that we are to "love the Lord with all our heart, soul and strength." The next six commandments are also summed up in one phrase; that we are to "love our neighbor as ourselves."

The Ten Commandments can be very simple for us to remember, if we know the concepts behind them: Love God and Love everyone else. If we keep these commands in the proper order and at the forefront of our heart and mind, we cannot go wrong. Love is the highest command and love never fails. (1 Corinthians 13:8). Love is the essence of the Law.

The Old and New Covenants

One may wonder why a study of the Ten Commandments are in order, if the Law has already been simplified to these two basic commandments. Why should we complicate the matter by adding a list of do’s and don’ts to such a beautiful and simple law of love? The answer is this: Do you already know how to love God perfectly? Do you know how to love others perfectly? Of course we don't without God showing us–although we eagerly anticipate the day when we will be just like Christ and then, having such love will come naturally to us. Until then, we must let the Spirit of God work within us and learn His ways and follow them. The essence of the Law is love, but it is the Ten Commandments that show us how to love. Without these commandments, the instructions to love would be very difficult to keep as everyone has a different idea about love. These commandments show us not only what love is, but also how we are to live by it in our everyday life.

His desire has been consistent from the beginning of the creation of man, and has been plainly stated in the Old Testament:

"These people come near to me with their mouth and honor me with their lips, but their hearts are far from me. Their worship of me is made up only of rules taught by men" (Isaiah 29:13 NIV).

"Behold, thou desirest truth in the inward parts: and in the hidden part thou shalt make me to know wisdom. Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean: wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow" (Psalm 51:6-7).

Again, in the following verse we see that God’s desire was for His law to be in our hearts, and not just an outward action. This verse speaks of the future covenant that God would make with His people, which was established in Christ. (Emphasis in following verses is mine).

"Behold, the days come, saith the LORD, that I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel, and with the house of Judah: Not according to the covenant that I made with their fathers in the day that I took them by the hand to bring them out of the land of Egypt; which my covenant they brake, although I was an husband unto them, saith the LORD: But this shall be the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel; After those days, saith the LORD, I will put my law in their inward parts, and write it in their hearts; and will be their God, and they shall be my people. And they shall teach no more every man his neighbour, and every man his brother, saying, Know the LORD: for they shall all know me, from the least of them unto the greatest of them, saith the LORD: for I will forgive their iniquity, and I will remember their sin no more" (Jeremiah 31:31-31).

There were many who lived under the Old Covenant, such as King David, who approached God with a New Covenant mentality. He knew that God desired more of him than merely keeping a list of rules. He wanted more than just a checklist to measure his righteousness and acceptability before God. He knew that God desired him to be an intimate friend and he wanted to know God in the same way.

Just as some under the Old Covenant lived with a New Covenant mentality; today, it is possible to have an Old Covenant mentality, even through one may be a Christian, and technically living under the New Covenant. Obeying the Law is not the end of the matter. It is only a vehicle to get us to the end of the matter, which is to enter into a mutual relationship of love and trust with God, where our hearts are consumed with love for Him. If we look at the law as the end of the matter, we will have the mentality of what we look like toward others, while God looks at our hearts and motives. However, if our hearts and motives are pure, certainly our actions will line up with our hearts. Those who walk to be seen of men as good, while inside they are not, are hypocrites. God way is to write His law on our hearts and make us holy from the inside out.

Receiving the Word of God With the Proper Attitude

I feel that it is necessary to interject a very important point here. God commands us to study His word. However, it is how we receive the word of God that makes all the difference in our lives. The Pharisees were known for their strict observance of the Law. They were very zealous for knowing and keeping the commandments of God, far more than the average Israelite. Yet, we find Jesus constantly rebuking them for their evil hearts.

Therefore we can see that it is possible to know the laws of God, but to no avail. We can study His word in-depth and still bear no harvest of righteousness. This is a sobering thought for all who wish to know the law and ways of God. We must be aware that the more we understand of His ways and righteousness, the greater the temptation we have to judge and condemn those who are not where we are. This is the temptation that the Pharisees fell into. They kept the outward law better than anyone in Israel, and yet they missed the entire point of it. Their lives were consumed with keeping the tiniest detail of the law and yet they broke the greatest commandments of love. Their self-righteous behavior indicated that the one thing they loved most was not God or even other people, but themselves. Let us learn from the mistake of the Pharisees. If we strive to obey these laws so that we may feel righteous and better than others, we have already broken them. If we strive to keep these commandments in an outward manner, while neglecting the inner principles of them, we are worse than a lawbreaker–we are a hypocrite.

What is one of the most despised and unattractive qualities that a human can possess? Wouldn’t we all agree that we hate interacting with someone who has a superior attitude towards us and the rest of the world? Whether they are right or wrong in their position matters little when all they have for others is criticism and condemnation. Those who treat others with contempt and arrogance are among the least liked people on the planet! This attitude is distasteful to God as well. He would rather be with one sinner who has a little humility, than one hundred "righteous" people who are prideful and intolerant of others.

Luke 18:10-14:

10 Two men went up into the temple to pray; the one a Pharisee, and the other a publican.
11 The Pharisee stood and prayed thus with himself, God, I thank thee, that I am not as other men are, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even as this publican.
12 I fast twice in the week, I give tithes of all that I possess.
13 And the publican, standing afar off, would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner.
14 I tell you, this man went down to his house justified rather than the other: for every one that exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted.

Self-righteousness always blinds us to the truth. The more self-righteous we are, the less of a true understanding we will have concerning who God really is. How else could it be that those who studied Scripture more than any others were the greatest stumbling blocks to those who sought the truth? How could it be that those who were most diligent in the Word, missed the author of the Word as He walked among them? Not only did they not recognize Him, but they violently opposed Him!

The Pharisees and lawyers of the day knew the Scriptures backwards and forwards. Yet, for all their study, they never saw the figure of Christ within the Scripture. In the following Scripture we see the accusation that Jesus makes against them. As we begin this study of the Ten Commandments, let us also take these words to heart, lest we also fall into the same trap as them.

"And the Father himself, which hath sent me, hath borne witness of me. Ye have neither heard his voice at any time, nor seen his shape. And ye have not his word abiding in you: for whom he hath sent, him ye believe not. Search the scriptures; for in them ye think ye haveeternal life: and they are they which testify of me. And ye will not come to me, that ye might have life. I receive not honour from men. But I know you, that ye have not the loveof God in you. I am come in my Father's name, and ye receive me not: if another shall come in his own name, him ye will receive. How can ye believe, which receive honour one of another, and seek not the honour that cometh from God only?" (John 5:37-44).

I want to make a few quick points from this verse. First, we can see that though the Pharisees diligently read the Word, and believed that they had eternal life through it, they were deceived. The word of God did not actually abide within them. They knew the Word, but it did not live in their hearts. If it did, they would have recognized the Lord when He came amongst them. Jesus also pointed out that it was impossible for them to believe in Him, as long as they were seeking honor from each other, rather than God.

Let us decide, therefore, that we will not seek after the honor and praise of men, whether they be of the world, or within the walls of religion. Seeking such praise will always hinder our faith. We must never read the Scriptures in an attempt to discern how we may obtain glory or praise, but rather how God alone may be glorified. It is not merely knowing the Scriptures, but rather it is living by them that saves us.

"But be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving your own selves" (James 1:22).

"Therefore whosoever heareth these sayings of mine, and doeth them, I will liken him unto a wise man, which built his house upon a rock" (Matthew 7:24).

It is noble to commit the Bible to our memory, as long as we do it for the right reason. But we must remember that playing with Scripture is like playing with dynamite. There is power in those words! The same Scripture that has the power to work for our life can also work for our death. If it is received wrongly, the very words that are intended to bring light, bring blindness instead. As soon as we mix our Bible Study with self-righteousness, we begin to have blurred vision. If we continue to mix these two, we will eventually be as blind as the Pharisees, who did not even know that they were blind.

"Ye blind guides, which strain at a gnat, and swallow a camel. Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye make clean the outside of the cup and of the platter, but withinthey are full of extortion and excess. Thou blind Pharisee, cleanse first that which is within the cup and platter, that the outside of them may be clean also" (Matthew 23:24-26).

"And he spake a parable unto them, Can the blind lead the blind? shall they not both fall into the ditch? The disciple is not above his master: but every one that is perfect shall be as his master. And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but perceivest not the beam that is in thine own eye?" (Luke 6:39-41).

"And Jesus said, For judgment I am come into this world, that they which see not might see; and that they which see might be made blind. And some of the Pharisees which were with him heard these words, and said unto him, Are we blind also? Jesus said unto them, If ye were blind, ye should have no sin: but now ye say, We see; therefore your sin remaineth" (John 9:39-41).

The more exposure to the Bible that we have, the greater responsibility we have to walk in truth. If we use our knowledge wrongfully, we are worse off than if we had never heard it in the first place. Someone may ask, "Well then, wouldn’t I be safer never reading the Bible at all? That way I won’t have to be held responsible for my actions."

Actually, there is no safety in ignoring the Word of God. Ignoring it is even more dangerous. It contains the instructions to life, and tells us what will take place in the future. If we do not read those instructions, and understand those prophecies, how can we make wise decisions that will lead us to life? Lack of knowledge leads to destruction.

"My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge: because thou hast rejected knowledge, I will also reject thee, that thou shalt be no priest to me: seeing thou hast forgotten the law of thy God, I will also forget thy children" (Hosea 4:6).

The wise person will take to heart the lessons of the past and consider the message that pertains to the future, so that he or she may find their own place and purpose in the world right now. The Bible is meant to bring light to our daily existence. It is the rod by which we may measure our heart. It is the message that shows us how to both overcome in this world, and to live in the next one as well.

"The grass withereth, the flower fadeth: but the word of our God shall stand for ever" (Isaiah 40:8).

Therefore we can see that the answer to this dilemma is actually quite simple. The only possible path that we are left with is to read and study God’s Word, with a humble and open heart to hear from God. We must be willing to drop all preconceived ideas, and acknowledge that the words we are reading are meant specifically for us (so often we apply the words of the Bible to others, when God wants us to look inside our own heart). Many have read the Bible, but have not been able to understand the message because their hearts were closed and dull.

If you want understanding, we are confident that the Lord will give it to you. He never holds Himself back from the one who truly desires to know Him. Before we go any farther in this study, let us pray for the guidance of the Lord:

"Father in Heaven, we come before You at this moment with a humble heart. We desire to know your ways, O God, that we might serve you correctly. We acknowledge that the ways of man are flawed and that we have missed the mark of walking with You in friendship and holiness, as You originally created us to do in the Garden. Now, God we ask for your guidance as we study Your commandments. Give us understanding and revelation of Your eternal principals. Open our eyes and heal us from all spiritual blindness. We invite Your Holy Spirit to guide us and teach us in the way of wisdom, for the purpose of knowing and loving You. May we receive Your love into our heart, and may Your great mercy make us into merciful people. Father, I ask that every person who partakes of this study will be changed. Let the life of God be awakened and revived within them. I pray this in the name of Your Beloved Son, Jesus. Amen."

The Law Shall Be On Our Hearts

All the way through the Bible, God deals with what goes on in the heart of man. Jesus especially focused His teaching on this issue. He always put His finger right on the motives of men. In the Old Testament, men were commanded not to commit murder. In the New Testament, Jesus further explained what this meant, by getting to the heart of the issue: hatred.

"Ye have heard that it was said by them of old time, Thou shalt not kill; and whosoever shall kill shall be in danger of the judgment: But I say unto you, That whosoever is angry with his brother without a cause shall be in danger of the judgment" (Matthew 5:21-22a).

"Whosoever hateth his brother is a murderer: and ye know that no murderer hath eternal life abiding in him" (1 John 3:15).

Because the heart issue is so important to God, in this study we will attempt to examine both the outward commandments, as well as the principals behind the commandment. We will also examine the internal motives that cause us to break them in the first place. God is calling us out of the world of slavery to sin, into a world of absolute freedom in Him.

"Don’t you know that when you offer yourselves to someone to obey him as slaves, you are slaves to the one whom you obey–whether you are slaves to sin, which leads to death, or to obedience which leads righteousness. But thanks be to God that, though you used to be slaves to sin, you wholeheartedly obeyed the form of teaching to which you were entrusted. You have been set free from sin and have become slaves to righteousness" (Romans 6:16-18 NIV).

"And God spoke all these words: "I am the LORD your God, who brought you out of Egypt, out of the land of slavery" (Exodus 1:1-2).

In these verses, it says that God brought His people out of the land of Egypt and out of the house of slavery or bondage. Egypt is a "type" of world and the devil. God will bring anyone who chooses to follow Him out of the bondage of sin and into God's freedom. Some of us have lived in bondage so long that we have a hard time adjusting to our new freedom. We are used to being in a cage, in a prison. Even after God brings us out it takes a while for us to operate in the freedom of Christ and learn the new laws of God and His ways

The Story of the Caged Chickens

Several years ago, we bought some chickens from a poultry farm. They were chickens who had lived their entire lives in a cage. We took them out to our ranch and turned them loose to freely run in the chicken yard and go in and out of the chicken house at will. As we placed them on the chicken house floor they didn't move. The poor little things had lived in cages all their life so they just stayed right in the chicken house. They didn't even know how to roost. They didn't even get up on the roost at night. They stayed huddled together on the floor. They were used to sleeping under a light because the poultry farmer kept a light lamp on them to make them lay more eggs. Men have devised ways to get the most out of everything, no matter if it's good for the animal or not. Because they were used to the light, they would sleep outside huddled under the moon on the ground.

They didn't even know how to drink water the regular way because they had only known to drink water out of a little bottle with a little red tip on it. They had always gone over and pushed that little tip and gotten their water out. Now, they had fresh running water yet they didn't even know how to drink. One of them almost drowned trying to learn how to drink. These chickens didn't know what freedom was. I don't know if they would have ever enjoyed their freedom without someone to teach them what to do. But we had some older chickens that were already there and after the new ones watched them for awhile they discovered a new way of living. Living with the older chickens for a time and learning from them they got liberated. Hallelujah! They found out that they could go anyplace in the barnyard. But it took them a while.

Humans are the same way. We are creatures of habit. We don't realize it, but we do things out of habit. God wants to break old habits and old things out of our lives that do not glorify Him. As soon as we become born again, the Holy Spirit will deal with various issues in our lives. We immediately begin to know and understand by the Spirit that certain things that seemed acceptable yesterday no longer can be tolerated. The Lord begins to mold us into the image of His Son and we see that our old habits are not fitting for God's kingdom or His house.

Moving Into God’s House

If somebody comes to visit our house and they have bad habits we will tolerate them on short-term basis. Out of the graciousness of our heart, we won't say anything. We will just put up with it and once they leave we will clean up behind them. However, if somebody comes to live with us, the rules are different. We may say, "Wait a minute. We have rules in this house. This is how we live here. We do not do these things in this house."

It's the same way with our Heavenly Father. When we come to God's house with some bad, filthy habits, He begins to show us the way out of bondage. Now that we are living in His house, the rules are different. God gives us commandments and rules so that we know what is acceptable in His house. If someone came to live in our own home with us, there would be certain rules they would be asked to follow. It would not be acceptable to throw the towels down on the bathroom floor. There would be certain things that we would expect of them. We would expect them to make up their beds when they got up in the morning. They would help with cleaning up the dishes, because we like our house to be neat and clean.

God likes His house neat and clean too. He says that those filthy things that we used to do are not acceptable in His house. That is the reason He gives us rules. The laws and commandments of God are given so that we might live a blessed life in this earth. God gives us these rules out of His love for us. As we study each of them, we will see how God designed them to be a blessing. His commandments come from His love for us.

When we first come into the kingdom, many of us don't know how to respond to this new freedom from sin. We have walked the old way for so long. We have bad habits and bad thought patterns. We are used to the old ways but God wants to show us a new way. This new way is by faith, walking in the Spirit and trusting God to break the old habits. He will certainly do it for anyone who desires to change. His power and grace are enough to transform us all.

As we begin this study of the commandments, let us remember that none of these come naturally to fallen human beings. These are not things that we all naturally do. That is why God repeatedly tells us to remember these commands. He knows how easy it is for us to forget them! We automatically respond to things in a certain way. However, God is saying to us, "I want to show you the new way by the Spirit, I'm going to give you My Spirit to break the old habits."

Conclusion

As we go through this study and see the principles of God behind these commandments, I believe that we will gain a greater appreciation of not only why these commandments were written, but also how to keep them in a way that pleases God. Jesus is our model in this endeavor, for He above all men, has kept the commandments of God in absolute perfection. He was the sinless One, the perfect sacrifice for our sin. His death and resurrection has opened a "new and living way" into the Holy place of God. This place is open, not to just a few saintly few, but to anyone who desires to enter therein.

Many, in their fear of becoming like a Pharisee, have thrown out much of the law and live with very low standards of holiness. Surely this reaction against legalism is not the answer. Self-righteous legalism and unholy liberty are both equally defiling and evil in the sight of God. Both send the wrong message to those who do not yet know God, and neither of these extremes can lead us, or anyone else, to Life. Both of these extremes oppose the work of the Cross and the power of the Holy Spirit.

Despite the failure of many who have gone before us to obtain the path of life, let us not be discouraged. God is calling us to press onward, in humility, holiness, and a burning fire of love for Him. The tools He has given us are more than abundant, and God’s power works strongly in behalf of those who seek Him with a pure heart. In fact, we will find that the more of ourselves that we give to the Lord, the greater ease we have in living and walking in His ways. As we yield to the dealings of the Holy Spirit in our life and as we seek to know and obey the word of God, we will achieve the most precious gift in the universe: eternal life with Lord of Life. His righteousness will be truly written on our heart, and we will share in His joy and freedom. Great peace awaits those who diligently give all that they are, that they may know the Lord of Glory, and obtain the priceless treasure of these few words taken from Matthew 25:21:

"Well done, good and faithful servant; thou hast been faithful over a few things, I will make thee ruler over many things: enter thou into the joy of thy lord."
 
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in one of the other thread's there are questions about this topic, so i thought i would bring this to the surface for other's to see, and check out for themselves.

One Heart,
 
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This is all I can say about the Ten Commandments.

It is the law that is perfect in converting the soul...it convicts the sinner and shows the sinner what sin is, so that they can repent from them.

The Ten Commandments are essential in doing that because...

"What shall we say, then? Is the law sin? Certainly not! Indeed I would not have known what sin was except through the law. For I would not have known what coveting really was if the law had not said, “Do not covet." - Romans 7:7

How can a sinner repent from his/her sins when they don't even know what sin is? Boom, that's where the Ten Commandments come in.

It's only to SHOW what sin is...but it's not to obeyed so that you think that's your ticket to salvation like the legalists/pharisees.

"because through Christ Jesus the law of the Spirit of life set me free from the law of sin and death." - Romans 8:2

Jesus is salvation and it's his grace that saves us...not the Law.

"The commandments, “Do not commit adultery,” “Do not murder,” “Do not steal,” “Do not covet,” and whatever other commandment there may be, are summed up in this one rule: “Love your neighbor as yourself.” - Romans 13:9

And of course, Love is the fulfillment of the Law...for in Love, there is no Sin.
 
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Vegan said:
What about Jesus breaking some of the commandments? what does that prove? does it prove that he was a man who made mistakes?

Honour thy father and mother:
Check out these scriptures.
Matt 10:37
Matt 10: 34-36
Luke 9: 59-62

Thou shall not kill

Luke 19:27
Matt 10:34-36

thou shalt not covet anything that is thy neighbours

Luke 19: 29-35

thou shall not steal

Luke 19: 29-35
Luke 6:1-5

that is just a few points that i have noticed when rading the NT. I would love all your views on this

Best wishes
Vegan
Read my following posts....
 
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Matthew 10:5-15 (New International Version)

5 These twelve Jesus sent out with the following instructions: “Do not go among the Gentiles or enter any town of the Samaritans. 6 Go rather to the lost sheep of Israel. 7 As you go, preach this message: ‘The kingdom of heaven is near.’ 8 Heal the sick, raise the dead, cleanse those who have leprosy,[a]drive out demons. Freely you have received, freely give. 9 Do not take along any gold or silver or copper in your belts; 10 take no bag for the journey, or extra tunic, or sandals or a staff; for the worker is worth his keep.

11 “Whatever town or village you enter, search for some worthy person there and stay at his house until you leave. 12 As you enter the home, give it your greeting. 13 If the home is deserving, let your peace rest on it; if it is not, let your peace return to you. 14 If anyone will not welcome you or listen to your words, shake the dust off your feet when you leave that home or town. 15 I tell you the truth, it will be more bearable for Sodom and Gomorrah on the day of judgment than for that town.

The Mission of Jesus' Agents
Jesus' instructions here show that the disciples would carry on most aspects of his mission (9:35-38). Even if one started from skeptical grounds, there is good evidence to suggest a historical basis for the account of Jesus' sending his disciples. Teachers could train disciples in part by giving them practice, and that Jesus did so best explains the disciples' rapid imitation of his miraculous ministry in the years immediately following the resurrection (compare 2 Cor 12:12). Yet Matthew provides these instructions not merely as a matter of historical interest-had his interest been merely historical he would not have rearranged the material in this section so thoroughly to be relevant to his readers-but as a living message to his own audience.

Thus he includes some of Jesus' teachings not strictly relevant to the first mission but which his audience would recognize as particularly relevant in their own day, including prosecution in synagogue and pagan courts (10:17-18; see F. Bruce 1972a:68; Morosco 1979; pace Schweitzer 1968:361). Likewise Matthew 11:1, unlike Mark, does not actually report the disciples' mission, because for Matthew the mission must continue in his own generation. Summoning his audience to greater commitment to the Gentile mission, he provides instructions for those who would go forth to evangelize, and in more general ways for the churches that send them.


Jesus Sends His Disciples (10:5)

When Jesus sent out his disciples, he literally "apostled" them. Thus he provides a relevant model for his appointed agents in subsequent generations (whether they are "apostles" in the narrower sense or not). The language used here for "sending" probably connotes commissioning agents with delegated authority. Ancient Israelite circles also used formal agents or messengers (as in Prov 10:26; 13:17; 26:6); agency eventually became a legal custom so pervasive that both Roman and Jewish law recognized the use of agents, or intermediary marriage brokers, in betrothals (Cohen 1966:295-96).


Agents did not always have high legal status; some were even slaves. Yet they carried delegated authority, acting on the authority of the one who sent them. Thus later teachers commonly remarked that a person's agent is "equivalent to the person himself" (t. Ta`anit 3:2; m. Berakot 5:5). How one treats Jesus' messengers or heralds therefore represents how one treats Jesus himself (Mt 10:40-42).

Because the agent had to be trustworthy to carry out his mission, teachers sometimes debated the character the pious should require of such agents (m. Demai 4:5; t. Demai 2:20). This also implies, of course, that an agent's authority was entirely limited to the scope of his commission and the faithfulness with which he carried it out. The fact that Jesus authorizes us to do acts of compassion in his name (Mt 9:36) does not authorize us to use his power to get whatever we want (4:3).

Jesus' agents were not like just any legal agents: in biblical history, God's agents were the prophets. The connections in this text between Jesus' commissioned messengers and prophets should not be overlooked (10:41; compare Boring 1982:89).

To Israel Alone (10:5-6)

This limitation fits the historic priority of Israel in salvation history (compare Rom 1:16; 2:9-10; 15:8-9), was practical (these disciples were not yet equipped to cross cultural boundaries) and would have undoubtedly not been objectionable to the first disciples themselves (compare Acts 10:28). Jesus did see a future hope for the Gentiles in the Scriptures (see comment on 8:11-12), but he limited his own mission primarily to Israel. In this text, however, Jesus' orders may address geography more than ethnicity (NIV mistranslates "way of Gentiles" as among the Gentiles); Jesus merely prohibits taking any of the roads leading to Hellenistic cities in Palestine (Manson 1979:179). Since Samaria and Gentile territories surrounded Galilee, Jesus' orders de facto limited his disciples' mission geographically, restricting their activity to Galilee (see Gundry 1982:185).

In contrast to other commandments in this chapter, however, Matthew indicates that Jesus later revokes this limitation (24:14; 28:19-20), specifically clarifying that this one command was a temporary measure during his earthly ministry. Indeed, by highlighting that the gospel's first recipients are Jewish, hence that even Jewish people may reject the kingdom and be treated as Gentiles (10:14-15), this limitation implies a supraethnic view of the kingdom that ultimately necessitates the Gentile mission.

Good News About God's Impending Kingdom (10:7)

That this good news about the kingdom remains the church's message (Acts 8:12; 20:24-25; 28:31) is clear not only from the fact that Matthew nowhere revokes it but also from the roughly parallel formulation in his Gospel's conclusion: as you go (not the imperative go as in the NIV rendering of 28:19) is a participle in both instances (10:7 and 28:19). We proclaim Jesus' lordship: he has all authority in the universe (28:18; Dan 7:13-14) and appears alongside the Father and the Spirit (28:19). To make disciples for this King is to proclaim the good news that God's future reign is already active in this age (compare 28:20).

Signs Bring Attention to the Message (10:8)

"The disciples' mission (vv. 7-8) replicates and extends the mission of Jesus in preaching the coming of God's kingdom and in healing the sick (see 4:23)" (Harrington 1982:45). Matthew emphasizes the continuity between Jesus' mission and that of the disciples precisely because the model of ministry God had exemplified in Jesus remains important for Jesus' followers (see more fully Wimber with Spring 1986:113-15; Keener 1996:85-89).

Insofar as possible, we should learn to demonstrate Jesus' rule the way Jesus did. Although hardhearted people may never be satisfied with signs (15:37-16:1; compare Jn 11:47-48; 12:10-11; Acts 4:16-17), signs can draw other people's attention to the gospel (Mt 11:3-6, 21, 23; see also Jn 2:11; Acts 4:29-30; 9:35, 42). If such ministry is more difficult in our rationalistic culture, it may be for that reason all the more important. Yet some parts of today's church that are open to miracles unfortunately have missed another part of Jesus' teaching on faith and mission: God's messengers must live simply (10:8-12).

Jesus' Agents Live Simply (10:8-10)

Cynic philosophers and many peasants had only one cloak. More relevant here, some Palestinian Jews known as Essenes showed their devotion to God by a simple lifestyle, especially those who lived in the wilderness (1QS 1.11-13; 6.22-23; Jos. Ant. 18.20; War 2.122). Josephus also indicates that Essenes did not take provisions when they traveled; they expected hospitality from fellow Essenes in every city (War 2.124-25).

Yet perhaps most relevant is the model of Israel's ancient prophets in times of national apostasy (for example, 1 Kings 18:13). One may recall Elisha's unwillingness to accept Naaman's gifts, preferring to allow the Aramean God-fearer to remain wholly indebted to Israel's God; his servant Gehazi, however, determined to profit from Naaman and suffered for it (2 Kings 5:20-27). Elisha reminded Gehazi that the current time of spiritual crisis rendered the acquisition of material possessions a vain pursuit (2 Kings 5:26). In contrast to Elisha, many Western Christians waste their income on worldly pursuits rather than committing all their resources to the kingdom.

On long trips, one typically brought both a change of clothes and money in a bag tied to one's belt or fastened around one's neck (Stambaugh and Balch 1986:38); Jesus here forbids the normal basic apparatus for travel. By prohibiting a bag (Mt 10:10; Mk 6:8) Jesus forbids begging, the survival method of the otherwise almost equally simple Cynics (Meeks 1986:107). Mark allows at least staff (for self-protection) and sandals, but Matthew's demand for simplicity is still more radical, prohibiting even these. This is not a matter of asceticism but of priorities, as in 6:19-34. These prohibitions would distinguish the disciples from other kinds of wandering preachers (like the Cynics in the Greek world) "whose questionable reputation they did not want to share" (Liefeld 1967:260; see also p. 247).

Paul's examples of apostleship in 1 Corinthians 4:9-13 and 2 Cor 4:8-12; 6:3-10; 11:24-33 (presented like philosophers' lists of sufferings) show the demands of a true apostolic call. Another early church document warns that if a prophet wants to stay more than three days or asks for money, he is a false prophet (Did. 11:5; compare 2 Cor 11:7-15); Matthew may have even had such false teachers in mind as he dictated this warning (Gundry 1982:186).

Although Christ does not send all Christians the same way he sent these disciples, their obedience to their calling challenges us to consider what we can sacrifice for the work of God's kingdom. Missionaries today will not all follow these specifications exactly (just as Mark apparently toned down Q's instructions for his own community); hospitality is not as dependable in most cultures as it was in first-century Jewish Palestine. Nevertheless, the message of this text summons us to radically value our mission above all possessions and to live as simply as necessary to devote our resources to evangelism.

Those who strive to "witness" to their neighbors by demonstrating that Christ can "bless" them with abundant possessions may unwittingly witness for a false gospel, reinforcing the same materialistic goals that drive many young men in ghettos to sell drugs and many politicians to sell their souls. Non-Christians often have the spiritual sense to recognize what much of the church ignores: tacking Jesus' name onto worldly values does not sanctify those values, it just profanes Jesus' name.

God Supplies for the Mission (10:10-11)

The disciples can travel light because they trust God to supply their needs where they minister. Ancient Mediterranean peoples, especially Jewish people, emphasized hospitality (as in Cicero De Officiis 2.18.64; Ps-Phocyl. 24; Test. Job 10:1-4). Because strangers could abuse this system, however, Jewish people outside Palestine depended heavily on letters of recommendation showing that the traveler was of good reputation. Jesus' messengers had better backing than a letter of recommendation, however; the authority of Jesus himself stood behind them (10:40-42; compare 2 Cor 3:1-6).

Responsibility and the Message (10:12-15)

The hearers would be judged by whether they embraced Christ's messengers. The missionaries were to use one home as their base of operations for evangelizing the community (10:11-12; compare Mk 6:10; Lk 10:7). They would find the home first by inquiring regarding who might hear their message (Mt 10:11), then by finding out if the household welcomed them to stay there (vv. 12-13). Greetings constituted an essential aspect of social etiquette in Mediterranean antiquity, and social convention dictated particular rules for how to greet persons of varying rank (23:7). But Jewish people also viewed their greetings as "wish-prayers": Shalom (salom), "peace," meant "May it be well with you." Just as a curse undeserved will not take effect (Prov 26:2), Jesus declares that the disciples' blessings will be efficacious only if they prove appropriate.

Those who received the agents of Christ ultimately received Christ himself (Mt 10:40-41), even if the only hospitality they had available to offer was a cup of water (v. 42). But those who rejected Christ's agents were to be treated like spiritual pagans (v. 14). Just as Jewish people returning to the Holy Land might shake the dust of Gentile lands from their feet, so Jesus' disciples were to treat those who rejected their message as unholy (Acts 13:51). God would treat these nations not merely like Gentiles in general, but worse than Sodom and Gomorrah (Mt 10:15), for they were rejecting a greater opportunity for repentance than Sodom had (11:23-24).
 
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Matthew 10:34-36 (New International Version)

Jesus Matters More Than Anything

The demands of the kingdom are so offensive to a world already convinced of its rightness that they provoke that world's hostility.

Opposition from Unconverted Family Members (10:34-37)

Although Jesus values families (5:27-32; 15:4-6; 19:4-9), the division his mission brings is particularly evident in families (compare 10:21; 1 Cor 7:16; of course more people prefer to quote Acts 16:31). Jesus' example demonstrates how this division is accomplished: although we are "harmless" (Mt 10:16; 12:19-20), God's agents proclaim the kingdom uncompromisingly and thus face hostility from others (13:57). Jesus' mission separates us from the values of our society, and society responds with persecution. Jesus selects these specific examples of in-laws (mother-in-law and daughter-in-law) because young couples generally lived with the man's family


Jesus matters more than the approval or even the civility of our family (10:37). Many viewed honoring one's parents as the highest social obligation (Ep. Arist. 228; Jos. Apion 2.206; Ps-Phocyl. 8); for many, God alone was worthy of greater honor (Deut 13:6; 33:9; 2 Macc 7:22-23).

Love Jesus More Than Life (10:38-39)

We must love Jesus not only more than our families but more than our own lives. For all our talk about low self-esteem these days (and most of us do view ourselves as less than what God has called us to be), the vast majority of people still cling desperately to life (compare Eph 5:29; Epict. Disc. 2.22.15-16). But the moment we become Christ's followers, our own lives and wills become forfeit; we die with Christ to sin (that is, to the right to make selfish choices; Rom 6:3-4) and choose a path that could lead any day to our execution for Christ's name (Mt 16:24). Although we may speak glibly today of "our cross" as the need to put up with Aunt Molly or a leaky roof, "taking up the cross" in Jesus' day meant being forced to bear the instrument of one's execution past a jeering mob to the site of one's imminent death as a condemned criminal (see Hengel 1977).

The promise of eternal life should be sufficient motivation for any who genuinely believe Jesus' claims-it doesn't take a math major to recognize that the greatest mortal longevity pales in comparison with eternity-but we sometimes prove less committed than we suppose (26:41). That even the first disciples were not initially prepared for such a demand (26:56) does not mitigate the level of commitment our Lord seeks from us: if we want to be followers of Jesus, we must be ready to die. If I value my life in this world more than I value Jesus and the life of the next world, I cannot be his disciple

Luke 9:59-62 (New International Version)

59He said to another man, “Follow me.”

But the man replied, “Lord, first let me go and bury my father.”

60Jesus said to him, “Let the dead bury their own dead, but you go and proclaim the kingdom of God.”

61Still another said, "I will follow you, Lord; but first let me go back and say good bye to my family."

62Jesus replied, “No one who puts his hand to the plow and looks back is fit for service in the kingdom of God.”

The Journey to Jerusalem

Many of the events and teachings described in this section, especially parabolic material, are unique to Luke. In fact, almost a third of the material in this part of Luke is unique. Here teaching is emphasized over miracle, in contrast to the previous section where they were fairly evenly distributed. The section's first few chapters reveal the deepening rift between Jesus and the Jewish leadership. In addition, this section indicates how Jesus instructed the disciples on spiritual matters. His teaching made it clear that their approach to spirituality would differ from that of the Jewish leadership.

The most neutral title for this unit would be "the central section," but many scholars call it "the Jerusalem journey." This name reflects various travel notices that speak of Jesus' heading to Jerusalem or of a journey (9:51, 53, 56; 13:22; 17:11; 18:31; 19:28). This is not a straight-line journey, since Luke has Jesus at Martha and Mary's home in Bethany in 10:38-42 and then has Jesus and the disciples up north between Samaria and Galilee in 17:11. Since John's Gospel tells us Martha's home is in the south (Jn 12:1-2), a straight-line journey is excluded. Luke portrays a journey of destiny in which Jesus must meet his fate (Lk 13:31-35).

As one considers the unit as a whole, two major themes stand out. The first is the growing rift between Jesus and the Jewish leaders. Much of 9:51--13:35 displays this tension. Jesus' criticism of the Jewish leaders follows the pattern of the deuteronomistic critique of Israel. Like the prophets from the time of Moses on, Jesus notes the ways in which the nation has been repeatedly unfaithful to God (Moessner 1989 develops this theme in detail).

The second major theme is Jesus' preparation of his disciples for his departure. He calls them to be faithful despite rejection by the world. Thus discipleship themes dominate the section. Discipleship is not easy; they must count the cost. They may suffer, but alongside the suffering come explicit promises of God's vindication. Disciples can know that God sees their suffering, and he will vindicate the righteous one day. No passage makes this last point more clearly than Luke 18:1-8. The way of the disciple is a "new way," unlike that of the religious leadership that rejects Jesus.
 
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Luke 19:27 (New International Version)

Jerusalem: The Innocent Slain and Raised

The final section of Luke's Gospel proceeds through various controversies in the city about Jesus' authority and his eschatological discourse. After the discourse come the final meal and Jesus' arrest. Luke notes four trials: one before the Jewish leadership, one before Pilate, one before Herod and one before the crowd. The masses persuade Pilate to slay Jesus at the Jewish leadership's instigation. On the cross Jesus is portrayed as slain in innocence. The soldier's confession in 23:47 sums up Luke's view. In the resurrection, which catches the disciples off guard, Jesus is vindicated and reveals himself to them, reviving their hope. His life has fulfilled the Scripture, and so will the preaching of repentance by the commissioned and empowered disciples (24:44-49).

Three themes dominate this section: Jesus is in control of events, the disciples need to be faithful and ready, and God is directing his plan. The "must" of Messiah's career comes to realization here. The issue is not so much how Jesus' death achieves God's will. That is a theological concern Paul explores in his picture of substitutionary atonement. Rather, Luke emphasizes who God vindicates and exalts through resurrection. Jesus is the slain innocent. He is risen and exalted to be Lord and Christ (Acts 2:22-39). With Jesus' departure, his disciples prepare to take up his work. The Gospel has an open-ended conclusion that leads to the story of the church, not only the church in Acts but beyond that early era to the church of today. For the story of the influence of the raised Jesus in the world continues to this day.

Matthew 10:34-36 (New International Version)

Jesus Matters More Than Anything

The demands of the kingdom are so offensive to a world already convinced of its rightness that they provoke that world's hostility.

Opposition from Unconverted Family Members (10:34-37)

Although Jesus values families (5:27-32; 15:4-6; 19:4-9), the division his mission brings is particularly evident in families (compare 10:21; 1 Cor 7:16; of course more people prefer to quote Acts 16:31). Jesus' example demonstrates how this division is accomplished: although we are "harmless" (Mt 10:16; 12:19-20), God's agents proclaim the kingdom uncompromisingly and thus face hostility from others (13:57). Jesus' mission separates us from the values of our society, and society responds with persecution. Jesus selects these specific examples of in-laws (mother-in-law and daughter-in-law) because young couples generally lived with the man's family


Jesus matters more than the approval or even the civility of our family (10:37). Many viewed honoring one's parents as the highest social obligation (Ep. Arist. 228; Jos. Apion 2.206; Ps-Phocyl. 8); for many, God alone was worthy of greater honor (Deut 13:6; 33:9; 2 Macc 7:22-23).

Love Jesus More Than Life (10:38-39)

We must love Jesus not only more than our families but more than our own lives. For all our talk about low self-esteem these days (and most of us do view ourselves as less than what God has called us to be), the vast majority of people still cling desperately to life (compare Eph 5:29; Epict. Disc. 2.22.15-16). But the moment we become Christ's followers, our own lives and wills become forfeit; we die with Christ to sin (that is, to the right to make selfish choices; Rom 6:3-4) and choose a path that could lead any day to our execution for Christ's name (Mt 16:24). Although we may speak glibly today of "our cross" as the need to put up with Aunt Molly or a leaky roof, "taking up the cross" in Jesus' day meant being forced to bear the instrument of one's execution past a jeering mob to the site of one's imminent death as a condemned criminal (see Hengel 1977).

The promise of eternal life should be sufficient motivation for any who genuinely believe Jesus' claims-it doesn't take a math major to recognize that the greatest mortal longevity pales in comparison with eternity-but we sometimes prove less committed than we suppose (26:41). That even the first disciples were not initially prepared for such a demand (26:56) does not mitigate the level of commitment our Lord seeks from us: if we want to be followers of Jesus, we must be ready to die. If I value my life in this world more than I value Jesus and the life of the next world, I cannot be his disciple.
 
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Luke 19:29-35 (New International Version)

29As he approached Bethphage and Bethany at the hill called the Mount of Olives, he sent two of his disciples, saying to them, 30“Go to the village ahead of you, and as you enter it, you will find a colt tied there, which no one has ever ridden. Untie it and bring it here. 31If anyone asks you, ‘Why are you untying it?’ tell him, ‘The Lord needs it.’ ”

32Those who were sent ahead went and found it just as he had told them. 33As they were untying the colt, its owners asked them, “Why are you untying the colt?”

34They replied, “The Lord needs it.”

35They brought it to Jesus, threw their cloaks on the colt and put Jesus on it.


Jerusalem: The Innocent Slain and Raised

The final section of Luke's Gospel proceeds through various controversies in the city about Jesus' authority and his eschatological discourse. After the discourse come the final meal and Jesus' arrest. Luke notes four trials: one before the Jewish leadership, one before Pilate, one before Herod and one before the crowd. The masses persuade Pilate to slay Jesus at the Jewish leadership's instigation. On the cross Jesus is portrayed as slain in innocence. The soldier's confession in 23:47 sums up Luke's view. In the resurrection, which catches the disciples off guard, Jesus is vindicated and reveals himself to them, reviving their hope. His life has fulfilled the Scripture, and so will the preaching of repentance by the commissioned and empowered disciples (24:44-49).

Three themes dominate this section: Jesus is in control of events, the disciples need to be faithful and ready, and God is directing his plan. The "must" of Messiah's career comes to realization here. The issue is not so much how Jesus' death achieves God's will. That is a theological concern Paul explores in his picture of substitutionary atonement. Rather, Luke emphasizes who God vindicates and exalts through resurrection. Jesus is the slain innocent. He is risen and exalted to be Lord and Christ (Acts 2:22-39). With Jesus' departure, his disciples prepare to take up his work. The Gospel has an open-ended conclusion that leads to the story of the church, not only the church in Acts but beyond that early era to the church of today. For the story of the influence of the raised Jesus in the world continues to this day.

Luke 6:1-5 (New International Version)

Verses 1-5
Christ justifies his disciples in a work of necessity for themselves on the sabbath day, and that was plucking the ears of corn when they were hungry. But we must take heed that we mistake not this liberty for leave to commit sin. Christ will have us to know and remember that it is his day, therefore to be spent in his service, and to his honour
 
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but the commandment says to work 6 days, you are talking about the second part of the commandment imo.
Are we so much into literal laws that we do not understand that God is looking at our hearts rather than our superficial obedience? If a person is in Jesus and Jesus is in him, will the man not know when to work and when not to work? Of course if we are quenching the Holy Spirit, then our old man is in the lead and no matter when we work or do not work, God will not be pleased
 

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