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INDIVIDUALS VS THE MAJORITY

Member

JLG

About Solomon:
  • Solomon asks Yah.weh for wisdom!
  • He builds Yah.weh’s temple!
  • He becomes very rich!
  • But it is never enough!
  • In the end, he gets 700 wives and 300 concibines!
  • Completely crazy!
  • And he starts following their gods!
  • And Yah.weh becomes furious at Solomon!
  • And he losts everything!
  • His descendants only keep one tribe because of David!
  • Otherwise they would have lost everything!
  • Man is so limited!
  • What a lesson!
  • Who cares?
 
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About Solomon:
  • Solomon asks Yah.weh for wisdom!
  • He builds Yah.weh’s temple!
  • He becomes very rich!
  • But it is never enough!
  • In the end, he gets 700 wives and 300 concibines!
  • Completely crazy!
  • And he starts following their gods!
  • And Yah.weh becomes furious at Solomon!
  • And he losts everything!
  • His descendants only keep one tribe because of David!
  • Otherwise they would have lost everything!
  • Man is so limited!
  • What a lesson!
  • Who cares?
Solomon was the prototype of the Beast from the Earth. The number of the Beast is 666, which is specifically associated with the tribute to Solomon - 666 talents of gold; it requires wisdom to count the number, and wisdom also alludes to Solomon who acquired God given wisdom. Then you consider these reports from Israel where some Jewish activists are planning to rebuild the temple, they've even bought five red heifer that are supposedly "without blemish" for sacrifice. I believe the Beast from the Earth will finish what they have started, he'll dedicate the temple to God, but the Antichrist of course will defile it with "abomination of desolation".
 
Member

JLG

Solomon was the prototype of the Beast from the Earth. The number of the Beast is 666, which is specifically associated with the tribute to Solomon - 666 talents of gold; it requires wisdom to count the number, and wisdom also alludes to Solomon who acquired God given wisdom. Then you consider these reports from Israel where some Jewish activists are planning to rebuild the temple, they've even bought five red heifer that are supposedly "without blemish" for sacrifice. I believe the Beast from the Earth will finish what they have started, he'll dedicate the temple to God, but the Antichrist of course will defile it with "abomination of desolation".
- Don't forget that in Revelation chapter 22:22, we are told about the new Jerusalem and its temple which is Yah.weh and the Lamb!
 
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I have seen the New Jerusalem. It is very beautiful. It came down from heaven and hovered just above the tree tops. It did not touch the earth from what I could see. I could not see in it, but was blessed to look upon it.
All praise glory and honor be unto God.
 
Member

JLG

  • In the Bible we are usually told about men!
  • When we are told about women, it is as wives and mothers!
  • In Genesis it is so with Eve, Sarah, Rebekah, Leah and Rachel!
  • Then we get the case of Miriam the prophetess!

Who was Miriam in the Bible? | GotQuestions.org

Miriam in the Bible is Moses’ older sister. She is called “Miriam the prophetess” in Exodus 15:20. She plays an important role in several episodes of Moses’ life and in the exodus of Israel from Egypt.

Miriam is the sister who watches over her baby brother Moses among the bulrushes on the banks of the Nile. Their mother had hidden Moses in a basket on the river bank to protect him from Pharaoh’s decree to throw all Hebrew baby boys into the river (Exodus 1:22—2:4). As Miriam watches, Pharaoh’s daughter discovers and pities Moses, and Miriam quickly intervenes to ask if the Egyptian princess would like a Hebrew woman to nurse the child for her. The princess agrees, and Miriam quickly gets their mother. Pharaoh’s daughter commands Moses’ biological mother to nurse him and bring him back to her when he is older. By the grace of God, Miriam helps save the infant Moses (Exodus 2:5–10).

Miriam had another brother, Aaron. Their parents, Amram and Jochebed (Exodus 6:20), were both from the Levite tribe of Israel (Exodus 2:1). Together, God uses Moses, Miriam, and Aaron to lead the people of Israel from slavery in Egypt to the Promised Land in Canaan (Micah 6:4). After miraculously crossing the Red Sea on dry ground and seeing the Egyptian army overthrown in the sea, Miriam leads the women with a tambourine in worshiping God with song and dance (Exodus 15:20–22). The words to Miriam’s song are recorded in verse 21: “Sing to the Lord, / for he is highly exalted. / Both horse and driver / he has hurled into the sea.” In this same passage, she is given the title “prophetess,” the first of only a handful of women in Scripture identified that way. Others called a “prophetess” are Deborah (Judges 4:4), Huldah (2 Kings 22:14), Isaiah’s wife (Isaiah 8:3), Anna (Luke 2:36), and Philip’s four daughters (Acts 21:9).

Unfortunately, Miriam later falls into a spirit of complaining. Both Miriam and Aaron criticize Moses for marrying a Cushite or Ethiopian woman, but Miriam is listed first (Numbers 12:1) so it is likely she instigated the complaint. While the complaint was ostensibly against Moses’ wife, the discontent ran deeper: “‘Has the Lord spoken only through Moses?’ they asked. ‘Hasn’t he also spoken through us?’” (Numbers 12:2). In her criticism, Miriam was questioning the Lord’s wisdom in choosing Moses as the leader.

God was angry that Miriam and Aaron were so willing to speak against the servant He had chosen. The Lord struck Miriam with leprosy. Aaron, realizing the foolishness of their words, repented of his sin, and Moses, ever the intercessor, prayed on behalf of his sister: “Moses cried out to the Lord, ‘Please, God, heal her!’” (Numbers 12:13). After a week-long quarantine, Miriam was healed and rejoined the camp. As Miriam’s leprosy convicted Aaron of the foolish words they had spoken against God’s chosen servant, it should also remind us not to judge those around us or live in jealousy when God has given a specific call to someone else (see Titus 3:1–15; James 1:26; 4:11–12; Ephesians 4:31; Philippians 4:8). Miriam had an opportunity to show the people of Israel what it meant to live in love as a servant of God without complaining, and, for most of her life, she did; but she failed in the matter of Moses’ wife. We, too, have opportunities to show the grumblers and complainers around us what it is to be a servant of Jesus Christ. Let us draw them to Jesus through our love and servanthood and not be drawn away from Him ourselves.

Our next encounter with Miriam is at the end of the 40-year desert wandering. Because of their grumbling and lack of faith in God, the first generation of Israelites to leave captivity was not allowed to enter the Promised Land. This included the prophetess Miriam. Most of the older generation had already died in the wilderness when Israel comes back to Kadesh, where they had started their wanderings. It’s here that Miriam dies and is buried (Numbers 20:1). Hers was a life of responsibility and service, of God’s calling and providence, yet it also reminds us that no one is too important to receive God’s discipline for personal sin (see 1 Corinthians 10:12).
 
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JLG

Deborah

According to the Book of Judges, Deborah (Hebrew: דְּבוֹרָה, Dəḇōrā, "bee") was a prophetess of the God of the Israelites, the fourth Judge of pre-monarchic Israel and the only female judge mentioned in the Hebrew Bible.

The only female judge, the only one to be called a prophet, and the only one described as performing a judicial function, Deborah is a decisive figure in the defeat of the Canaanites. This is a victory told in two accounts, a prose narrative in Judges 4 and a poem, known as the Song of Deborah, in Judges 5.

Deborah was a worshiping warrior. She found encouragement and strength in worship to be obedient to everything the Lord was asking her to do. If Deborah had played small in her life, she would not have had all the experiences that led to her being used by the Lord to deliver Israel from bondage.

Deborah’s distinct characteristics​

Apart from the various roles she played, Deborah had also several special qualities.

She was:

  • Strong. She was a well-known military leader when the entire nation was in despair.
  • Brave. She was called by God to lead at a terrible time. Deborah stepped forward with heroism in obedience to God to lead the Israelites in a period of challenge and persecution.
  • Wise. She served God and His people with wisdom and knowledge. She listened to everyone coming to her for a piece of advice and then replied to them with a God-fearing attitude and wisdom.
  • Supportive. She supported the people God had called her to lead.
  • Motherly. She was called a mother of Israel.
  • Obedient. God trusted her with His Word and directions. Whatever God told her to do or say, she did.
  • Respected. She stood tall amid adversity, not thinking of herself but keeping the best and the future of the nation in front of her. Her obedience to God and her wise answers earned her the respect of the people.
  • Impeccable. She didn’t fail in any task during the full 40 years of judging Israel (Judges 5:31) until her death in 1067 BC.
  • Truthful. She only said what God told her, and nothing else. She shared God’s message and not her own agenda.
  • Confident. She was confident in God and never wavered to fulfill God’s commands because of what people may think. She knew God was with her and would protect her.
  • Stable. She was stable and of robust character. Adversity nor prosperity could disturb her spirituality, power, and inner peace.
  • Humble. She put God’s will above her own will, humbling herself to God’s leading. When it was time to receive the honor of her victory, she rather gave honor to God.
 
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JLG

Who was Deborah in the Bible? | GotQuestions.org

Deborah was one of the judges of Israel during a time of oppression. She is called a prophetess and the wife of Lappidoth. The Lord spoke through her as she held court under a tree called “the Palm of Deborah” in Ephraim. The Lord also used her to set her people free and defeat the king of Canaan. Deborah’s story is found in Judges, chapters 4 and 5.

Deborah was Israel’s only female judge. Some scholars have suggested that her position as judge was itself a judgment on the weak-willed men of Israel. Because Israel’s men were unfit to judge, God chose a woman for the job, partly to shame the men who should have taken the leadership. Other commentators believe that Deborah’s role as judge was a sign of God’s comforting presence in the midst of His oppressed and downtrodden people.

When Deborah became judge, the Israelites had been subjugated for 20 years by Jabin, king of Canaan. The commander of Jabin’s army was named Sisera, and he had 900 iron chariots – formidable weapons against Israel’s foot soldiers (Judges 4:3). The Israelites were treated very cruelly by Sisera and his army, and Israel’s spirits were very low. Deborah describes the hardship of living under Jabin and Sisera this way: “The highways were abandoned, and travelers kept to the byways. The villagers ceased in Israel; they ceased to be” (Judges 5:6-7). In other words, people feared to leave their homes; traveling was very dangerous.

God’s word comes through Deborah to a man of Naphtali named Barak. The message is that he will lead the revolt against Sisera. Barak’s response is, “I’ll only go if Deborah goes with me” (Judges 4:8). Everyone was afraid of Sisera, including Barak. Deborah agrees to accompany Barak, but she also prophesies that the honor for the victory would belong to a woman, not to Barak (Judges 4:9).

When the time came for battle, God again spoke through Deborah, who prompted Barak to marshal his forces. The Israelites came against the army of Sisera, and God granted the victory. The mighty Sisera himself was brought down by the hand of a woman, just as Deborah had said. As the commander rested after the battle, a woman named Jael drove a tent peg through his head.

Who was Deborah in the Bible? We can see that God’s power is what matters, regardless of the instrument He chooses to use. Man or woman, strong or weak, confident or hesitant – all are strong when they are moved by God’s Spirit and filled with His strength. We can also see in Deborah a picture of God’s tender care for His people. As a mother cares for her children, so Deborah led and nurtured Israel (Judges 5:7).
 
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JLG

Who was Ruth in the Bible? | GotQuestions.org

Ruth was “of the women of Moab” but was genetically linked to Israel through Lot, the nephew of Abraham (Ruth 1:4; Genesis 11:31; 19:37). Ruth lived in the time of the judges. She had married the son of an Israelite family while they were living in Moab, but at some point her father-in-law, her husband, and her husband’s only brother died. So Ruth had to make a decision whether to stay in Moab, her home, or to go with her mother-in-law, Naomi, to a land she had never known—Judah.

Ruth loved her mother-in-law and had great compassion for her, seeing that she had lost not only her husband but both of her sons. Ruth’s sister-in-law, Orpah, made the choice to stay with her people in Moab, but Ruth could not bear to part from Naomi or from the God of Israel that she had come to know. Together, Ruth and Naomi made the journey back to Judah to the city of Bethlehem, where they decided to settle. Ruth’s testimony spread, and Boaz, the owner of a nearby field, heard of her faithfulness, as recorded in Ruth 2:11–12: “Boaz replied, ‘I’ve been told all about what you have done for your mother-in-law since the death of your husband—how you left your father and mother and your homeland and came to live with a people you did not know before. May the LORD repay you for what you have done. May you be richly rewarded by the LORD, the God of Israel, under whose wings you have come to take refuge.’”

The custom of Israel was that a man was to take his deceased brother’s wife in order to continue the family line. Since Ruth’s husband’s only brother had also died, she and Naomi would have to take care of themselves. Ruth went out every day to glean fields to provide food for herself and Naomi. She found work in Boaz’s field, not knowing that he was a relative of Naomi’s. When Boaz returned home, he noticed Ruth and asked the man in charge of the reapers about her. The servant told Boaz about Ruth’s faithfulness to Naomi and her hard work in the fields. Boaz personally told Ruth to remain in his fields and stay close to the other women, also telling her that he’d warned the young men not to touch her and inviting her to drink freely of the water the men had drawn anytime she was thirsty (Ruth 2:8–9). Ruth responded in humility and appreciation, asking why he would show such favor to her, a foreigner, at which point Boaz told her he’d heard of her sacrifice for her mother-in-law (Ruth 2:10–13). Boaz continued to show her every courtesy, providing a meal to her and instructing his reapers to purposefully leave some grain behind for her to glean (Ruth 2:14–16).

When Ruth told Naomi where she had gleaned, Naomi was happy and told Ruth that Boaz was a close relative, a kinsman of Elimelech, Naomi’s husband; therefore, Boaz was qualified to become Ruth’s kinsman-redeemer. It was of the utmost importance in Israel to perpetuate the name of every family of Israel, so this gave Ruth the right to appeal to Boaz to fill that role. Naomi encouraged Ruth to continue gleaning in Boaz’s fields, which she did through the barley and wheat harvests (Ruth 2:18–23).

At the barley harvest, Naomi suggested that Ruth go to Boaz while he winnowed barley and essentially ask him to be her kinsman-redeemer. Ruth had an open mind and a teachable spirit, so she listened to her mother-in-law and did as she had requested (Ruth 3:2–5). Ruth followed Naomi’s instructions to the letter. Boaz responded favorably, but he knew of an even closer male relative who would be first in line to redeem Ruth and her family’s property. That man had to be consulted before Boaz could take Ruth as a wife. The very next day, Boaz met with the other relative, who legally relinquished all his rights to Ruth and Naomi’s property.

Ruth and Boaz soon married and had a son named Obed. The women of the land rejoiced, seeing the faithfulness of God and saying to Naomi, "Praise be to the Lord, who this day has not left you without a guardian-redeemer. May he become famous throughout Israel! He will renew your life and sustain you in your old age. For your daughter-in-law, who loves you and who is better to you than seven sons, has given him birth" (Ruth 4:14–15).

Ruth trusted the Lord, and He rewarded her faithfulness by giving her not only a husband but a son (Obed), a grandson (Jesse), and a great-grandson named David, the king of Israel (Ruth 4:17). Besides these gifts (Psalm 127:3), God gave Ruth the blessing of being listed in the lineage of Jesus (Matthew 1:5).

Ruth is an example of how God can change a life and take it in a direction He has foreordained. We see Him working out His perfect plan in Ruth’s life, just as He does with all His children (Romans 8:28). Although Ruth came from a pagan background in Moab, once she met the God of Israel, she became a living testimonial to Him by faith. Even though she lived in humble circumstances before marrying Boaz, she believed that God was faithful to care for His people. Also, Ruth is an example to us of hard work and faithfulness. We know that God rewards faithfulness: “And without faith it is impossible to please God, because anyone who comes to him must believe that he exists and that he rewards those who earnestly seek him” (Hebrews 11:6).
 
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JLG

Ruth 1:1

In the days
בִּימֵי֙ (bî·mê)
Preposition-b | Noun - masculine plural construct
Strong's 3117: A day

when the judges
הַשֹּׁפְטִ֔ים (haš·šō·p̄ə·ṭîm)
Article | Verb - Qal - Participle - masculine plural
Strong's 8199: To judge, pronounce sentence, to vindicate, punish, to govern, to litigate

ruled,
שְׁפֹ֣ט (šə·p̄ōṭ)
Verb - Qal - Infinitive construct
Strong's 8199: To judge, pronounce sentence, to vindicate, punish, to govern, to litigate

there was
וַיְהִ֗י (way·hî)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's 1961: To fall out, come to pass, become, be

a famine
רָעָ֖ב (rā·‘āḇ)
Noun - masculine singular
Strong's 7458: Famine, hunger

in the land.
בָּאָ֑רֶץ (bā·’ā·reṣ)
Preposition-b, Article | Noun - feminine singular
Strong's 776: Earth, land

And a certain man
אִ֜ישׁ (’îš)
Noun - masculine singular
Strong's 376: A man as an individual, a male person

from
מִבֵּ֧ית (mib·bêṯ)
Preposition
Strong's Hebrew

Bethlehem
לֶ֣חֶם (le·ḥem)
Preposition | Noun - proper - feminine singular
Strong's 1035: Bethlehem -- 'place of bread', a city in Judah, also a city in Zebulun

in Judah,
יְהוּדָ֗ה (yə·hū·ḏāh)
Noun - proper - masculine singular
Strong's 3063: Judah -- 'praised', a son of Jacob, also the southern kingdom, also four Israelites

with his wife
וְאִשְׁתּ֖וֹ (wə·’iš·tōw)
Conjunctive waw | Noun - feminine singular construct | third person masculine singular
Strong's 802: Woman, wife, female

and two
וּשְׁנֵ֥י (ū·šə·nê)
Conjunctive waw | Number - mdc
Strong's 8147: Two (a cardinal number)

sons,
בָנָֽיו׃ (ḇā·nāw)
Noun - masculine plural construct | third person masculine singular
Strong's 1121: A son

went
וַיֵּ֨לֶךְ (way·yê·leḵ)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's 1980: To go, come, walk

to reside
לָגוּר֙ (lā·ḡūr)
Preposition-l | Verb - Qal - Infinitive construct
Strong's 1481: To turn aside from the road, sojourn, to shrink, fear, to gather for, hostility

in the land
בִּשְׂדֵ֣י (biś·ḏê)
Preposition-b | Noun - masculine plural construct
Strong's 7704: Field, land

of Moab.
מוֹאָ֔ב (mō·w·’āḇ)
Noun - proper - feminine singular
Strong's 4124: Moab -- a son of Lot,also his descendants and the territory where they settled


  • It was at the time of Judges in Israel!
  • There was a famine!
  • A couple went with his two sons to Moab!
  • They were from Bethlehem in Judah!
 
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JLG

Ruth 1:2

The man’s
הָאִ֣ישׁ (hā·’îš)
Article | Noun - masculine singular
Strong's 376: A man as an individual, a male person

name
וְשֵׁ֣ם (wə·šêm)
Conjunctive waw | Noun - masculine singular construct
Strong's 8034: A name

was Elimelech,
אֱ‍ֽלִימֶ֡לֶךְ (’ĕlî·me·leḵ)
Noun - proper - masculine singular
Strong's 458: Elimelech -- 'God is king', the husband of Naomi

his wife’s
אִשְׁתּ֨וֹ (’iš·tōw)
Noun - feminine singular construct | third person masculine singular
Strong's 802: Woman, wife, female

name
וְשֵׁם֩ (wə·šêm)
Conjunctive waw | Noun - masculine singular construct
Strong's 8034: A name

was Naomi,
נָעֳמִ֜י (nā·‘o·mî)
Noun - proper - feminine singular
Strong's 5281: Naomi -- mother-in-law of Ruth

and the names
וְשֵׁ֥ם (wə·šêm)
Conjunctive waw | Noun - masculine singular construct
Strong's 8034: A name

of his two
שְׁנֵֽי־ (šə·nê-)
Number - mdc
Strong's 8147: Two (a cardinal number)

sons
בָנָ֣יו ׀ (ḇā·nāw)
Noun - masculine plural construct | third person masculine singular
Strong's 1121: A son

were Mahlon
מַחְל֤וֹן (maḥ·lō·wn)
Noun - proper - masculine singular
Strong's 4248: Mahlon -- the first husband of Ruth

and Chilion.
וְכִלְיוֹן֙ (wə·ḵil·yō·wn)
Conjunctive waw | Noun - proper - masculine singular
Strong's 3630: Chilion -- a son of Naomi

They were Ephrathites
אֶפְרָתִ֔ים (’ep̄·rā·ṯîm)
Noun - proper - masculine plural
Strong's 673: Ephraimite -- a descendant of Ephraim, also an inhabitant of Ephrath

from
מִבֵּ֥ית (mib·bêṯ)
Preposition
Strong's Hebrew

Bethlehem
לֶ֖חֶם (le·ḥem)
Preposition | Noun - proper - feminine singular
Strong's 1035: Bethlehem -- 'place of bread', a city in Judah, also a city in Zebulun

in Judah,
יְהוּדָ֑ה (yə·hū·ḏāh)
Noun - proper - masculine singular
Strong's 3063: Judah -- 'praised', a son of Jacob, also the southern kingdom, also four Israelites

and they entered
וַיָּבֹ֥אוּ (way·yā·ḇō·’ū)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person masculine plural
Strong's 935: To come in, come, go in, go

the land
שְׂדֵי־ (śə·ḏê-)
Noun - masculine plural construct
Strong's 7704: Field, land

of Moab
מוֹאָ֖ב (mō·w·’āḇ)
Noun - proper - feminine singular
Strong's 4124: Moab -- a son of Lot,also his descendants and the territory where they settled

and settled
וַיִּֽהְיוּ־ (way·yih·yū-)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person masculine plural
Strong's 1961: To fall out, come to pass, become, be

there.
שָֽׁם׃ (šām)
Adverb
Strong's 8033: There, then, thither

  • A couple with their two sons settle in Moab!
  • They are Ephrathites from Bethlehem in Judah!
 
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JLG

Ruth 1:3

- Naomi’s husband dies!
- Then she stays with her two sons!

Ruth 1:4

- Her two sons marry two moabite women, Orpah and Ruth!
- They live in Moab for ten years!

Ruth 1:5

  • Then her two sons die!
 
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JLG

Ruth 1:6

When
כִּ֤י (kî)
Conjunction
Strong's 3588: A relative conjunction

[Naomi] heard
שָֽׁמְעָה֙ (šā·mə·‘āh)
Verb - Qal - Perfect - third person feminine singular
Strong's 8085: To hear intelligently

in Moab
מוֹאָ֔ב (mō·w·’āḇ)
Noun - proper - feminine singular
Strong's 4124: Moab -- a son of Lot,also his descendants and the territory where they settled

that
כִּֽי־ (kî-)
Conjunction
Strong's 3588: A relative conjunction

the LORD
יְהוָה֙ (Yah·weh)
Noun - proper - masculine singular
Strong's 3069: YHWH

had attended to
פָקַ֤ד (p̄ā·qaḏ)
Verb - Qal - Perfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's 6485: To visit, to oversee, muster, charge, care for, miss, deposit

His people
עַמּ֔וֹ (‘am·mōw)
Noun - masculine singular construct | third person masculine singular
Strong's 5971: A people, a tribe, troops, attendants, a flock

by providing
לָתֵ֥ת (lā·ṯêṯ)
Preposition-l | Verb - Qal - Infinitive construct
Strong's 5414: To give, put, set

them
לָהֶ֖ם (lā·hem)
Preposition | third person masculine plural
Strong's Hebrew

with food,
לָֽחֶם׃ (lā·ḥem)
Noun - masculine singular
Strong's 3899: Food, bread, grain

she
הִיא֙ (hî)
Pronoun - third person feminine singular
Strong's 1931: He, self, the same, this, that, as, are

and her daughters-in-law
וְכַלֹּתֶ֔יהָ (wə·ḵal·lō·ṯe·hā)
Conjunctive waw | Noun - feminine plural construct | third person feminine singular
Strong's 3618: Daughter-in-law, bride

prepared
וַתָּ֤קָם (wat·tā·qām)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person feminine singular
Strong's 6965: To arise, stand up, stand

to leave
וַתָּ֖שָׁב (wat·tā·šāḇ)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person feminine singular
Strong's 7725: To turn back, in, to retreat, again

the land
מִשְּׂדֵ֣י (miś·śə·ḏê)
Preposition-m | Noun - masculine plural construct
Strong's 7704: Field, land

of Moab.
מוֹאָ֑ב (mō·w·’āḇ)
Noun - proper - feminine singular
Strong's 4124: Moab -- a son of Lot,also his descendants and the territory where they settled

  • So there is food for the Israelites thanks to Yah.weh!
  • So Naomi wants to go back to her country with her two daughters-in-law!
 
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Ruth 1:7

  • So Naomi and her two daughters-in-law are on their way to Judah!


Ruth 1:8

  • Naomi tells her two daughters-in-law to go back to their country!
 
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JLG

Ruth 1:9

May the LORD
יְהוָה֙ (Yah·weh)
Noun - proper - masculine singular
Strong's 3068: LORD -- the proper name of the God of Israel

enable
יִתֵּ֤ן (yit·tên)
Verb - Qal - Imperfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's 5414: To give, put, set

each of you
אִשָּׁ֖ה (’iš·šāh)
Noun - feminine singular
Strong's 802: Woman, wife, female

to find
וּמְצֶ֣אןָ (ū·mə·ṣe·nā)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Imperative - feminine plural
Strong's 4672: To come forth to, appear, exist, to attain, find, acquire, to occur, meet, be present

security
מְנוּחָ֔ה (mə·nū·ḥāh)
Noun - feminine singular
Strong's 4496: Repose, peacefully, consolation, an abode

in the home
בֵּ֣ית (bêṯ)
Noun - masculine singular construct
Strong's 1004: A house

of your new husband.”
אִישָׁ֑הּ (’î·šāh)
Noun - masculine singular construct | third person feminine singular
Strong's 376: A man as an individual, a male person

And she kissed
וַתִּשַּׁ֣ק (wat·tiš·šaq)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person feminine singular
Strong's 5401: To kiss, to equip with weapons

them
לָהֶ֔ן (lā·hen)
Preposition | third person feminine plural
Strong's Hebrew

as they wept
וַתִּבְכֶּֽינָה׃ (wat·tiḇ·ke·nāh)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person feminine plural
Strong's 1058: To weep, to bemoan

aloud
וַתִּשֶּׂ֥אנָה (wat·tiś·śe·nāh)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person feminine plural
Strong's 5375: To lift, carry, take

  • For Naomi, her daughters-in-law should go back to their country and get new husbands!
  • She thinks that’s the better way for them!
  • She will do what she can for herself!
 
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Ruth 1:10

and said,
וַתֹּאמַ֖רְנָה־ (wat·tō·mar·nāh-)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person feminine plural
Strong's 559: To utter, say

“Surely
כִּי־ (kî-)
Conjunction
Strong's 3588: A relative conjunction

we will return
נָשׁ֖וּב (nā·šūḇ)
Verb - Qal - Imperfect - first person common plural
Strong's 7725: To turn back, in, to retreat, again

with you
אִתָּ֥ךְ (’it·tāḵ)
Preposition | second person feminine singular
Strong's 854: Nearness, near, with, by, at, among

to your people.”
לְעַמֵּֽךְ׃ (lə·‘am·mêḵ)
Preposition-l | Noun - masculine singular construct | second person feminine singular
Strong's 5971: A people, a tribe, troops, attendants, a flock


  • But they want to stay with Naomi!
 
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Ruth 1:11

But Naomi
נָעֳמִי֙ (nā·‘o·mî)
Noun - proper - feminine singular
Strong's 5281: Naomi -- mother-in-law of Ruth

replied,
וַתֹּ֤אמֶר (wat·tō·mer)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person feminine singular
Strong's 559: To utter, say

“Return home,
שֹׁ֣בְנָה (šō·ḇə·nāh)
Verb - Qal - Imperative - feminine plural
Strong's 7725: To turn back, in, to retreat, again

my daughters.
בְנֹתַ֔י (ḇə·nō·ṯay)
Noun - feminine plural construct | first person common singular
Strong's 1323: A daughter

Why
לָ֥מָּה (lām·māh)
Interrogative
Strong's 4100: What?, what!, indefinitely what

would you go
תֵלַ֖כְנָה (ṯê·laḵ·nāh)
Verb - Qal - Imperfect - second person feminine plural
Strong's 1980: To go, come, walk

with me?
עִמִּ֑י (‘im·mî)
Preposition | first person common singular
Strong's 5973: With, equally with

[Are] there still
הַֽעֽוֹד־ (ha·‘ō·wḏ-)
Adverb
Strong's 5750: Iteration, continuance, again, repeatedly, still, more

sons
בָנִים֙ (ḇā·nîm)
Noun - masculine plural
Strong's 1121: A son

in my womb
בְּֽמֵעַ֔י (bə·mê·‘ay)
Preposition-b | Noun - masculine plural construct | first person common singular
Strong's 4578: The intestines, the abdomen, sympathy, a vest, the stomach, the uterus, the heart

to become
וְהָי֥וּ (wə·hā·yū)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Conjunctive perfect - third person common plural
Strong's 1961: To fall out, come to pass, become, be

your husbands?
לַאֲנָשִֽׁים׃ (la·’ă·nā·šîm)
Preposition-l | Noun - masculine plural
Strong's 376: A man as an individual, a male person

  • But Naomi tells them to leave her and go back to their country to find new husbands!
  • That’s the way they were used to!
 
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Ruth 1:12

Return home,
שֹׁ֤בְנָה (šō·ḇə·nāh)
Verb - Qal - Imperative - feminine plural
Strong's 7725: To turn back, in, to retreat, again

my daughters.
בְנֹתַי֙ (ḇə·nō·ṯay)
Noun - feminine plural construct | first person common singular
Strong's 1323: A daughter

Go on,
לֵ֔כְןָ (lê·ḵə·nā)
Verb - Qal - Imperative - feminine plural
Strong's 1980: To go, come, walk

for
כִּ֥י (kî)
Conjunction
Strong's 3588: A relative conjunction

I am too old
זָקַ֖נְתִּי (zā·qan·tî)
Verb - Qal - Perfect - first person common singular
Strong's 2204: To be or become old

to have
מִהְי֣וֹת (mih·yō·wṯ)
Preposition-m | Verb - Qal - Infinitive construct
Strong's 1961: To fall out, come to pass, become, be

another husband.
לְאִ֑ישׁ (lə·’îš)
Preposition-l | Noun - masculine singular
Strong's 376: A man as an individual, a male person

Even if
כִּ֤י (kî)
Conjunction
Strong's 3588: A relative conjunction

I thought
אָמַ֙רְתִּי֙ (’ā·mar·tî)
Verb - Qal - Perfect - first person common singular
Strong's 559: To utter, say

there was
יֶשׁ־ (yeš-)
Adverb
Strong's 3426: Being, substance, existence, is

hope
תִקְוָ֔ה (ṯiq·wāh)
Noun - feminine singular
Strong's 8615: A cord, expectancy

for me
לִ֣י (lî)
Preposition | first person common singular
Strong's Hebrew

to have
הָיִ֤יתִי (hā·yî·ṯî)
Verb - Qal - Perfect - first person common singular
Strong's 1961: To fall out, come to pass, become, be

a husband
לְאִ֔ישׁ (lə·’îš)
Preposition-l | Noun - masculine singular
Strong's 376: A man as an individual, a male person

tonight
הַלַּ֙יְלָה֙ (hal·lay·lāh)
Article | Noun - masculine singular
Strong's 3915: A twist, night, adversity

and
גַּ֣ם (gam)
Conjunction
Strong's 1571: Assemblage, also, even, yea, though, both, and

to bear
יָלַ֥דְתִּי (yā·laḏ·tî)
Verb - Qal - Perfect - first person common singular
Strong's 3205: To bear young, to beget, medically, to act as midwife, to show lineage

sons,
בָנִֽים׃ (ḇā·nîm)
Noun - masculine plural
Strong's 1121: A son


  • Naomi keeps on her same traditional speech!
  • There was only one way for women at this time: get a husband!
 
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Ruth 1:13

would you wait
תְּשַׂבֵּ֗רְנָה (tə·śab·bê·rə·nāh)
Verb - Piel - Imperfect - second person feminine plural
Strong's 7663: To scrutinize, to expect

for them
הֲלָהֵ֣ן ׀ (hă·lā·hên)
Conjunction
Strong's 3860: Popularly for, if, therefore

to
עַ֚ד (‘aḏ)
Preposition
Strong's 5704: As far as, even to, up to, until, while

grow up?
יִגְדָּ֔לוּ (yiḡ·dā·lū)
Verb - Qal - Imperfect - third person masculine plural
Strong's 1431: To grow up, become great

Would you refrain
תֵּֽעָגֵ֔נָה (tê·‘ā·ḡê·nāh)
Verb - Nifal - Imperfect - second person feminine plural
Strong's 5702: To shut oneself in or off

from
לְבִלְתִּ֖י (lə·ḇil·tî)
Preposition-l
Strong's 1115: A failure of, not, except, without, unless, besides, because not, until

having
הֱי֣וֹת (hĕ·yō·wṯ)
Verb - Qal - Infinitive construct
Strong's 1961: To fall out, come to pass, become, be

husbands?
לְאִ֑ישׁ (lə·’îš)
Preposition-l | Noun - masculine singular
Strong's 376: A man as an individual, a male person

No,
אַ֣ל (’al)
Adverb
Strong's 408: Not

my daughters,
בְּנֹתַ֗י (bə·nō·ṯay)
Noun - feminine plural construct | first person common singular
Strong's 1323: A daughter

it grieves
מַר־ (mar-)
Verb - Qal - Perfect - third person masculine singular
Strong's 4843: To be, bitter

me
לִ֤י (lî)
Preposition | first person common singular
Strong's Hebrew

very much
מְאֹד֙ (mə·’ōḏ)
Adverb
Strong's 3966: Vehemence, vehemently, wholly, speedily

for
מִכֶּ֔ם (mik·kem)
Preposition | second person masculine plural
Strong's 4480: A part of, from, out of

your sakes that
כִּֽי־ (kî-)
Conjunction
Strong's 3588: A relative conjunction

the hand
יַד־ (yaḏ-)
Noun - feminine singular construct
Strong's 3027: A hand

of the LORD
יְהוָֽה׃ (Yah·weh)
Noun - proper - masculine singular
Strong's 3068: LORD -- the proper name of the God of Israel

has gone out
יָצְאָ֥ה (yā·ṣə·’āh)
Verb - Qal - Perfect - third person feminine singular
Strong's 3318: To go, bring, out, direct and proxim

against me.”
בִ֖י (ḇî)
Preposition | first person common singular
Strong's Hebrew

  • For Naomi, everything is clear:
  • Her two daughters-in-law must leave her and go back to their country and get married to survive!
  • It is just a question of survival!
  • Her own case is not important!
  • She is old!
 
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Ruth 1:14

Again
ע֑וֹד (‘ō·wḏ)
Adverb
Strong's 5750: Iteration, continuance, again, repeatedly, still, more

they wept
וַתִּבְכֶּ֖ינָה (wat·tiḇ·ke·nāh)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person feminine plural
Strong's 1058: To weep, to bemoan

aloud,
וַתִּשֶּׂ֣נָה (wat·tiś·śe·nāh)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person feminine plural
Strong's 5375: To lift, carry, take

and Orpah
עָרְפָּה֙ (‘ā·rə·pāh)
Noun - proper - feminine singular
Strong's 6204: Orpah -- sister-in-law of Ruth

kissed
וַתִּשַּׁ֤ק (wat·tiš·šaq)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person feminine singular
Strong's 5401: To kiss, to equip with weapons

her mother-in-law {goodbye},
לַחֲמוֹתָ֔הּ (la·ḥă·mō·w·ṯāh)
Preposition-l | Noun - feminine singular construct | third person feminine singular
Strong's 2545: Husband's mother

but Ruth
וְר֖וּת (wə·rūṯ)
Conjunctive waw | Noun - proper - feminine singular
Strong's 7327: Ruth -- 'friendship', a Moabite ancestress of David

clung
דָּ֥בְקָה (dā·ḇə·qāh)
Verb - Qal - Perfect - third person feminine singular
Strong's 1692: To impinge, cling, adhere, to catch by pursuit

to her.
בָּֽהּ׃ (bāh)
Preposition | third person feminine singular
Strong's Hebrew

  • We must remember that Orpah and Ruth have been married 10 years with Naomi’s sons!
  • So they have spent a lot of time with Naomi!
  • We can imagine they have developed a strong relationship with her!
  • Finally, Orpah goes away!
  • But Ruth doesn’t!
 
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Ruth 1:15

“Look,”
הִנֵּה֙ (hin·nêh)
Interjection
Strong's 2009: Lo! behold!

said Naomi,
וַתֹּ֗אמֶר (wat·tō·mer)
Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Consecutive imperfect - third person feminine singular
Strong's 559: To utter, say

“your sister-in-law
יְבִמְתֵּ֔ךְ (yə·ḇim·têḵ)
Noun - feminine singular construct | second person feminine singular
Strong's 2994: A sister-in-law

has gone back
שָׁ֣בָה (šā·ḇāh)
Verb - Qal - Perfect - third person feminine singular
Strong's 7725: To turn back, in, to retreat, again

to
אֶל־ (’el-)
Preposition
Strong's 413: Near, with, among, to

her people
עַמָּ֖הּ (‘am·māh)
Noun - masculine singular construct | third person feminine singular
Strong's 5971: A people, a tribe, troops, attendants, a flock

and
וְאֶל־ (wə·’el-)
Conjunctive waw | Preposition
Strong's 413: Near, with, among, to

her gods;
אֱלֹהֶ֑יהָ (’ĕ·lō·he·hā)
Noun - masculine plural construct | third person feminine singular
Strong's 430: gods -- the supreme God, magistrates, a superlative

follow
שׁ֖וּבִי (šū·ḇî)
Verb - Qal - Imperative - feminine singular
Strong's 7725: To turn back, in, to retreat, again

[her] back home.”
אַחֲרֵ֥י (’a·ḥă·rê)
Preposition
Strong's 310: The hind or following part

  • Naomi tells Ruth to do like Orpah, that is go back to her country and find a husband there!
  • She is straight in her boots!
 
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