• Welcome to Talk Jesus

    A true bible based, Jesus centered online community. Join over 13,000 members today

    Register Log In

About Love

Users who viewed this discussion (Total:8)

Active
Eph 4:2 . . Be completely humble and gentle; be patient, putting up with another in love.

The Greek word translated "love" in that passage is agape (ag-ah'-pay) which is fortunate because it doesn't necessarily speak of affection like the Greek word phileo. It mostly pertains to personal conduct, e.g. civility, courtesy, sympathy, thoughtfulness, tolerance, charity, kindness, tact, lenience, understanding, diplomacy, etc. which are common social skills that even the most insensitive clod on earth can practice if they put their mind to it.

"Humility" is one of those virtues that people love to talk about; but rarely ever seem to exemplify. The Greek word is a tongue twister. It's tapeinophrosune (tap-i-nof-ros-oo'-nay) which means humiliation of mind, viz: modesty; defined by Webster's as free from conceit and/or vanity.

"Conceit" is defined as excessive appreciation of one's own worth or virtue, viz: arrogance, i.e. a superiority complex and/or a master-race mentality. (A conceited supervisor was a very key factor in the Chernobyl disaster. Had he been more reasonable, and less arrogant, the disaster might've been easily averted.)

"Vanity" is defined as inflated pride in oneself, viz: narcissism and/or self adoration.

Cosmetics and figure-shaping undergarments don't really qualify as the kind of vanity that Paul is talking about; which is a kind of vanity that goes way beyond just trying to look your best.

Sinful vanity is an ugly creature. It's self aggrandizing and it isn't gentle either, on the contrary; vanity can be quite cruel and competitive, caring only what's best for itself. Vanity abhors associating with people whose station in life is decidedly below its own; and God forbid someone below themselves should have the nerve to correct either their conduct or their knowledge.

"Patience" is defined as the power, or capacity, to endure without complaint something and/or someone difficult or disagreeable; especially when it comes to certain folk who seem to have a knack for getting on people's nerves.
_
 
Active
Eph 4:3 . . Make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace.

Peace can be roughly defined as the absence of strife, e.g. debating, quarrelling, rivalry, competition and/or envy, etc. The Spirit has much to say in regard to Christian social skills; and if each and every believer would listen to Him, the natural result is going to be harmony wherever and whenever they associate with one another.
_
 
Active
Eph 4:25 . . Each of you must put off falsehood and speak truthfully to his neighbor, for we are all members of one body.

One's neighbor is not the same as one's brother; i.e. the former is an acquaintance, the latter is kin.

The command is directed at "each" of you-- i.e. individuals --because one dishonest Christian disgraces all Christians, and raises questions about the credibility of their religion because that's the way propaganda machinery works.

» Dishonesty is an unkind, destructive behavior.

"A lying tongue hates its victims" (Prov 26:28)
_
 
Active
Eph 4:26a . . In your anger do not sin.

Anger isn't eo ipso evil. It's how one manages their anger that matters. Anger can be a very useful tool when it's applied by somebody who knows what they're doing. For example:

"And when Jesus had looked round about on them with anger, being grieved for the hardness of their hearts, he saith unto the man: Stretch forth thine hand. And he stretched it out: and his hand was restored whole as the other." (Mark 3:5)

Everybody gets angry from time to time; just don't let it drive you to doing something contrary to your better judgment, e.g. violence, profanity, malice, cruelty, uncivil behavior, spite, ugly remarks, emotional outbursts, demeaning comments, grudging, hysteria, shouting, spraying spittle, etc.
_
 
Active
Eph 4:26b-27 . . Do not let the sun go down while you are still angry, and do not give the Devil a foothold.

Some people treat their anger like a prized possession: they don't want to lose it. They actually prefer to stay angry rather than "get over it". To them, anger management is for weaklings.

Apparently the Devil is quick to find a use for Christians like that, i.e. they become what's known in the spy business as an asset.
_
 
Active
Eph 4:29 . . Don't use foul or abusive language. Let everything you say be good and helpful, so that your words will be an encouragement to those who hear them.

"helpful" is translated from the Greek word oikodome (oy-kod-om-ay') which means: to build up (as opposed to tearing down).

"foul or abusive" is from the word sapros (sap-ros') which means: rotten, i.e. worthless (literally or morally) viz: inappropriate.

The foul and abusive category no doubt includes not only profanity, but also biting sarcasm, thoughtless remarks, demeaning comments, chafing, relentless fault-finding, sneering, ridicule, mean spirited rejoinders, mockery, and unnecessary criticism.
_
 
Active
Eph 4:31 . . Get rid of all bitterness, rage, anger, harsh words, and slander, as well as all types of malicious behavior.

It wasn't The Lord's wish that Ephesian Christians avoid all bitterness, rage and anger, brawling and slander, along with every form of malice; no; on the contrary, he wanted the Ephesians to "get rid" of them.

"bitterness" is from the Greek word pikria (pik-ree'-ah) which means: acrid, poisonous, and/or toxic (literally or figuratively). Christians like that are nothing in the world but deadly reptiles.

"The poison of asps is under their lips" (Rom 3:13b)

"rage" is from thumos (thoo-mos') which means: passion (as if breathing hard). Passion is just the opposite of reason; and as everyone knows, emotions are incoherent; so it's to be expected an emotional person is not acting rationally. This is a kind of conduct that Paul says brings sorrow to God's Spirit.

"anger" is from orge (or-gay') which means: desire (as a reaching forth or excitement of the mind), i.e. (by analogy,) violent passion, ire, (by implication: punishment)

People overcome by orge typically want some satisfaction; even to the point of at least your ruin; if not your death.

"harsh words" is from krauge (krow-gay') which means: outcry.

Out-crying is what protestors do; in other words: assertive, in-your-face confrontational complaints and/or demands.

"slander" is from blasphemia (blas-fay-me'-ah) which means: to vilify. Webster's defines "vilify" as: (1) to lower in estimation or importance, and (2) to utter slanderous and abusive statements against; viz: defame, discredit, and/or denigrate.

A statement need not be false in order to qualify as slander; it need only to be unnecessary; viz: you'll often hear people say: Well, I was only telling the truth. Were they? No, that's a ruse. In reality, they're insensitive; and they don't care who gets hurt by their thoughtless remarks.

The Lord notices the words people say, and he also takes note of the spirit in which they say them.

"But I tell you that men will have to give account on the day of judgment for every careless word they have spoken." (Matt 12:36)

"malicious behavior" is from kakia (kak-ee'-ah) which means: badness, i.e. (subjectively) depravity, or (actively) malignity, or (passively) trouble:

Malice sometimes includes the element of "spite" which Webster's defines as: petty ill will, or hatred, with the disposition to irritate, annoy, or thwart. Compare that to the Greek word for "persecute" in the eighth Beatitude which means, literally: to pursue; viz: to stalk, to hound, to harass.

Webster's defines "thwart" as: (1) to run counter to so as to effectively oppose or baffle; viz: contravene, and (2) to oppose successfully; viz: to defeat the hopes or aspirations of; in other words: to deliberately get in someone's way; block, discourage.

Boy I'll tell you, that Ephesian church was as rough-hewn and crude as the old logging community of Stump Town (now Portland) out here in the Oregon of the 1800's. They cussed, they brawled, they bad-mouthed, they held grudges, they were thieves, they were arrogant, they somehow had the idea that Jews were below them, they were immodest, conceited, vain, and impatient, they walked unworthy of their calling, and they were splintered into cliques.

» I've heard more than one expositor praise the Ephesians as "the church at its spiritual peak" but I thoroughly disagree. Yes, there were some outstanding individuals, but by and large that congregation's spiritual condition was decadent, deplorable, despicable, and unbecoming.

Paul began his letter to the Ephesians by saying that he made mention of them in his prayers; asking that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the glorious Father, might give them the Spirit of wisdom and revelation; and also that the eyes of their heart might be enlightened. (Eph 1:17-19)

Well, it seems to me that kind of prayer isn't for advanced Christians, rather, for Christians just starting out. From thence, Paul went on to explain some of Christianity's most treasured doctrines, which I assume the Ephesians had no knowledge of till Paul wrote to them.

I'll grant that the letter to the Ephesians is lofty, but I will not grant that the Ephesians themselves were lofty: not from how Paul lectured them.
_
 
Active
Eph 4:32 . . Be kind and compassionate to one another, forgiving each other, just as in Christ God forgave you.

Within the context of the letter Paul wrote and sent to the Christians residing in the ancient city of Ephesus; the objects "one another" and "each other" are exclusive; viz: the comments refer only to one's fellow Bible-believing Christians rather than the world at large. So if you're unwilling to be kind and compassionate to outsiders; at least be so with people at church so as to help prevent church from becoming a hostile worship environment.

The Greek word translated "kind" is chrestos (khrase-tos') which means: employed; viz: useful.

Chrestos is found in only seven places in the New Testament, and without exception implies being beneficial to others for their own good rather than using people to benefit your own self.

The word for "compassionate" is eusplagchnos (yoo'-splangkh-nos) which means: sympathetic.

Webster's defines sympathy as: 1) an affinity, association, or relationship between persons or things wherein whatever affects one similarly affects the other, 2) inclination to think or feel alike: emotional or intellectual accord, 3) feeling of loyalty: tendency to favor or support, 4) the act, or capacity, of entering into or sharing the feelings or interests of another, 5) sensitivity, and 6) heart; as in "have a heart".

Eusplagchnos would make a good substitute for a word found in one of The Lord's beatitudes.

"Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy." (Matt 5:7)

"merciful" is from the word eleemon (el-eh-ay'-mone) which means pretty much the same thing as eusplagchnos: compassionate and sympathetic.

It used to be that Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts were trained to be useful to others as just simply a matter of good deeds and good citizenship. I don't know, maybe they still are; but I've known lots of churchians who were totally useless to others because they're infected with an ugly spirit of conceit, rivalry, and indifference. Far from being kind and compassionate; those Christians are actually sociopathic and don't even know it.

The word "forgiving" is charizomai (khar-id'-zom-ahee) which essentially means: to grant as a favor; viz: gratuitously, i.e. courtesy.

Webster's defines gratuitous as: 1) given unearned or without recompense, 2) not involving a return benefit or compensation or consideration, 3) costing nothing: free, 4) not called for by the circumstances: unwarranted, 5) complimentary, 6) gratis, and 7) voluntary. In other words; charizomai seeks no reciprocation; it never says "you owe me one"

Sailors are oft heard to say that the sea is very unforgiving: meaning it allows no room for error or weakness. Christians ought not be like the sea. We ought to be the most forgiving people on the planet; and not because we expect others to reciprocate; but just because we enjoy being gratuitous. For some Christians though, courtesy is an effort.

Eph 4:31-32 isn't easy. What we're looking at there is not just good citizenship; no, what we're looking at is something divine in both its nature and its behavior.
_
 
Active
Eph 5:2 . . Live a life of love, just as Christ loved us and gave himself up for us as a fragrant offering and sacrifice to God.

Christ's love went way beyond just being friendly and helpful. His was a sacrificial kind of love; in other words: it was protective and supportive at the cost of deep expense to himself-- but not just as a humanitarian. Christ's life counted for more than just being neighborly, his life of love was an act of worship.

"I have come down from heaven, not to do my own will, but the will of Him who sent me." (John 6:38)

"I do always those things that please Him." (John 8:29)

In point of fact, God prefers to be worshipped by concern for others than by church attendance.

"This is how we know what love is: Jesus Christ laid down his life for us. And we ought to lay down our lives for our brothers." (1John 3:16)

"For I desire mercy, not sacrifice, and acknowledgment of God rather than burnt offerings." (Hos 6:6)
_
 
Active
Eph 5:21 . . Submit to one another out of respect for Christ.

The Greek word for "submit" is hupotasso (hoop-ot-as'-so) which means: to subordinate (as a verb) which is just the opposite of dominate and/or compete.

A workable synonym for the kind of submission we're talking about here is "deference" which Webster's defines as: (1) respect and esteem due a superior or an elder, and (2) affected, or ingratiating, regard for another's wishes; viz: honor.

This isn't about a pecking order. What we're talking about here is a Christian social skill; it's about regarding others as not equal to yourself, but actually better than yourself; and it pleases Christ to do so; besides being just plain all around good manners.

"Whoever humbles himself as a little child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven." (Matt 18:3-4)

Little children in that day were minors who had little or no social status at all to speak of. If somebody abused a minor; it was just too bad since there were no Child Services bureaus to defend them. Minors were typically among those ruled rather than among those who do the ruling; and they got like zero-to-none respect from their elders.

In other words; an imperious Christian-- one that's assertive, bossy, take charge, demanding, argumentative, quarrelsome, impudent, conceited, domineering, confrontational, manipulative, reactive, independent, non negotiable, opinionated, obstinately or intolerantly devoted to their own opinions and prejudices, stubborn, and insistent upon their own way --is definitely a failure at associating with their fellow Christians in a manner acceptable to Christ.
_
 
Active
Eph 5:21 . . Submit to one another out of respect for Christ.

The Greek word for "submit" is hupotasso (hoop-ot-as'-so) which means: to subordinate (as a verb) which is just the opposite of dominate and/or compete.

A workable synonym for the kind of submission we're talking about here is "deference" which Webster's defines as: (1) respect and esteem due a superior or an elder, and (2) affected, or ingratiating, regard for another's wishes; viz: honor.

This isn't about a pecking order. What we're talking about here is a Christian social skill; it's about regarding others as not equal to yourself, but actually better than yourself; and it pleases Christ to do so; besides being just plain all around good manners.

"Whoever humbles himself as a little child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven." (Matt 18:3-4)

Little children in that day were minors who had little or no social status at all to speak of. If somebody abused a minor; it was just too bad since there were no Child Services bureaus to defend them. Minors were typically among those ruled rather than among those who do the ruling; and they got like zero-to-none respect from their elders.

In other words; an imperious Christian-- one that's assertive, bossy, take charge, demanding, argumentative, quarrelsome, impudent, conceited, domineering, confrontational, manipulative, reactive, independent, non negotiable, opinionated, obstinately or intolerantly devoted to their own opinions and prejudices, stubborn, and insistent upon their own way --is definitely a failure at associating with their fellow Christians in a manner acceptable to Christ.
_
blessed post and wisdom filled to me God bless and thankyou beetow x
 
Active
Eph 6:2-3 . . Honor your father and mother-- which is the first commandment with a promise --that it may go well with you and that you may enjoy long life on the earth.

The promise doesn't guarantee long life; it promises that, should you perchance survive to a ripe old age, they'll be good years. In other words; though a demon seed may live long and prosper, that doesn't necessarily mean they'll have a pleasant time of it. Things like happiness, peace, love, understanding, and contentment may end up eluding them every step of the way.

The Greek word translated "honor" in Eph 6:2 is timao (tim-ah'-o) which means to prize, viz: to fix a valuation upon; to revere, to think highly of.

The very same word is used at Matt 15:4-6 where Jesus related the fifth commandment to caring for one's dependent parents. Compare that to 1Tim 5:4 where it's said:

"If a widow has children or grandchildren, these should learn first of all to put their religion into practice by caring for their own family and so repaying their parents and grandparents, for this is pleasing to God."

I should point out that one's parents need not be deserving of honor. They only need to be one's parents; whether good parents or bad parents makes no difference. Compare that to Lev 19:32 where respect for senior citizens is required merely because God says so. The citizen need not earn people's respect; all that's required of them is old age.
_
 
Active
hello im glad you addresed the part weather or not the parents are good or bad as many have had terrible experiences so helpfull .also ive read before maybe from one of your other posts you use the wrods demon seed please can you explain this to me as unsure as to your meaning x hole u dont mind me asking x thankyou
 
Active
"Demon Seed" is an old colloquialism that speaks of a child that's bad to the bone right out of the womb; if not sooner or later.
_
ok well what about when our own children go off the rails drugs women/men gambling rude ect i have many kids and they are all on different paths some holy spirit filled others rebellious ones and i pray for them always so your thoughts plz x
 
Active
what about when our own children go off the rails drugs women/men gambling rude ect i have many kids and they are all on different paths some holy spirit filled others rebellious ones and i pray for them always so your thoughts plz
For a number of years now; my son has been rude, thoughtless, dishonest, and unkind. He was like that before going off to college; and was much worse by the time he graduated. Plus, he became an alcoholic. It got to the point where I couldn't stomach his disrespect any longer so I finally decided to disassociate with my son just to save my sanity.

I didn't disown him, he's still my kin and I worry about his safety; but I don't want to know him anymore; he's not the kind of people I prefer. My disassociation with him was actually an act of self defense-- mental and emotional survival.
_
 
Active
Eph 6:4 . . Fathers, do not exasperate your children; instead, bring them up in the training and instruction of The Lord.

Too often the first half of that verse is omitted and the focus swung entirely upon the second. Well; let's break ranks and include the first half for a change because a daddy's parenting style has far more effect upon a growing child than his religion.

To begin with: despotism, tyranny, and unfairness are not The Lord's way of raising kids; but rather; his way is the manner of a shepherd; and "good" shepherds aren't cruel to their flocks.

Maybe you don't burn your kids with cigarettes, pour Tabasco sauce in their eyes, or lock them in a hall closet without food and water for two days; but do you ignore their opinions, demean them with denigrating labels, ridicule them, threaten their lives, work them as slaves without compensation, deny them things just so you won't appear to indulge them, and/or say "no" to their requests for no good reason than that you don't want to seem weak and under their control?

Do you routinely abuse their human rights, and/or relegate them to the level of livestock rather than bona fide human beings with feelings and a mind of their own? Do you nurture within them a feeling of importance, of belonging in your home, or do you make them feel like an invasive species and/or an uninvited guest? Kids pick up on things like that.

But aren't there moms out there exasperating their kids? Of course! Mothers can be just as tyrannical, just as despotic, and just as unfair as dads.

I believe it is a Spirit-filled dad's sacred filial duty to defend his children from their own mother's abuses should the need arise. Not many dads are willing to do that because it means risking having the wife turn against him; so quite a few dads opt to sacrifice the children in order to keep momma happy.

In my opinion, throwing one's own children to the wolves in order to avoid living in the same house with a moody woman has to be one of the worst possible sins a man can ever commit in his own home. It's just downright cowardly; and tells the kids they can't trust the one man in the whole world upon whom they should be able to rely in times of distress.

» The Bible predicts that towards the end, parents will become callous with their babies.

"This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come. For people shall be . . .without natural affection" (2Tim 3:1-3)

The Greek word translated "without natural affection" is astorgos (as'-tor-gos) which means: hard-hearted towards kindred; viz: lacking in sympathetic understanding i.e. unfeeling, pitiless, thoughtless, insensitive, cruel, and inhumane.
_
 
Active
For a number of years now; my son has been rude, thoughtless, dishonest, and unkind. He was like that before going off to college; and was much worse by the time he graduated. Plus, he became an alcoholic. It got to the point where I couldn't stomach his disrespect any longer so I finally decided to disassociate with my son just to save my sanity.

I didn't disown him, he's still my kin and I worry about his safety; but I don't want to know him anymore; he's not the kind of people I prefer. My disassociation with him was actually an act of self defense-- mental and emotional survival.
_
i totally understand the effect of thier behaviour
it effects us and yes i had to tell my son nearly 30 yrs.old now to leave our home as it was getting uglier by the day.
i cover him in prayer daily and see little glimpses of hope he visited me the
other day and said mom i love you God bless you and im going to go to church and walked out so
I praise God who can save and deliver him and also my hubby addictions and mental health go hand in hand and it destroys familys and people .
I thank God through it all because Greater is he
so good to share our common experiences as sometimes were hidden alone trying hoping and praying for help a word, and Godly wisdom thankyou for sharing your experience a great help x God bless you x
 
Active
Eph 6:9a . . And masters, treat your slaves in the same way. Do not threaten them, since you know that he who is both their Master and yours is in heaven,

The "masters" in that verse are Christian masters; Paul's letters were written and sent to churches rather than to the world at large.

If there is one political maxim that seems to ring true in every generation, it's that power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. It's in the human heart to abuse authority and to oppress and exploit people rather than manage them to everyone's advantage.

Christian masters, and Christian slaves, are siblings together in God's family (Gal 3:28). Therefore, Christ's law is to be exemplified by both the slave and by his master.

"My command is this: Love each other as I have loved you. Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends." (John 15:12-13)

A slave master willing to sacrifice his life to protect his slaves would be a very unusual master; but that is the very attitude of a Spirit-filled master towards his Christian slaves; and should be the attitude of a Spirit-filled supervisor towards his Christian employees: which is the attitude of a good shepherd rather than that of a self-serving predator.
_
 
Active
Phil 1:27 . .Whatever happens, conduct yourselves in a manner worthy of the gospel of Christ. Then, whether I come and see you or only hear about you in my absence, I will know that you stand firm in one spirit, contending as one man for the faith of the gospel.

"conduct yourselves in a manner worthy of the gospel of Christ" is talking about Christian social skills, e.g. kindness, courtesy, tact, diplomacy, tolerance, lenience, civility, encouragement, sympathy, compassion, etc.

Those kinds of behaviors have the effect of bonding people instead of alienating them. When people are bonded, they are more likely to pull together instead of working independently and/or against each other.
_
 
Top