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What's red and bad for your teeth?

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Member
A linguistics professor is giving a lecture and after a long-winded explanation about the concept of negatives begins his conclusion and says, "So, as we can see, in some languages a double negative is a positive, and in other languages a double negative is still a negative, but in no language is a double positive a negative."

A voice from the back of the classroom says, "Yeah, right."
 
Loyal
Reminds me of the Daniel Webster joke...
An English teacher told him "sugar" was the word in the English language where su sounded like sh.
According to the joke... Daniel Webster asked him.. "are you sure".
 
Member
LOL. Clever answer, yes! I remembered this joke before which was given on a convention that I attend. Oh! I suddenly missed it! Full of jokes and laughters!
 
Member
B-A-C,
re: "Reminds me of the Daniel Webster joke...:
An English teacher told him 'sugar' was the word in the English language where su sounded like sh.
According to the joke... Daniel Webster asked him.. 'are you sure'."

I don't see the joke.
 
Active
B-A-C,
re: "Reminds me of the Daniel Webster joke...:
An English teacher told him 'sugar' was the word in the English language where su sounded like sh.
According to the joke... Daniel Webster asked him.. 'are you sure'."

I don't see the joke.
I Don't see it either.
 
Loyal
But "shure" isn't a word.

Oh, I guess he is saying doubt and having the other guy consider the possibiliy of that "sure" could be spelled "shure".
And their being two words that sound the same that mean different things depending on the content, which goes to show his teacher wasnt correct.
 
Member
But the joke only works with the word "only" added - i.e., The claim was made - that sugar is the only word where "su" sounds like "sh".
 

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