• Hi Guest!

    You may be aware that "big tech" has been aggressively censoring conservatives on Twitter, Facebook, Google, Instagram, YouTube and other social media platforms. This is tyrannical and suppressive towards Christians and conservatives.

    Please share Talk Jesus community on every platform you have to give conservatives an outlet and safe community to be apart of.

    Support This Community

    Thank You

  • Welcome to Talk Jesus

    A true bible based, Jesus centered online community. Join over 13,000 members today

    Register Log In

Tribulations’ School

Active
For believers, everything encountered, even all that is self-originating is used for their good (Ro 8:28); which is for the purpose of being continually “conformed into the image of His Son” (v 9), via growing in their faith. Thusly is all that transpires in the lives of the saints which is sovereignly controlled, and each day can be welcomed thereby!

For our spiritual growth we must remember to “lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us,” and “Cast all your care upon Him” (Heb 12:1; 1Pe 5:7). Learning to do these two commands manifests the exercising of our faith towards always entrusting God with everything—especially concerning the “hardness,” which results in making us a “partaker of the afflictions of the gospel according to the power of God” (2Ti 2:3; 2Ti 1:8).
NC



Tribulations’ School


“Tribulation worketh patience” (Ro 5:3). The father’s school of tribulations is very distasteful to the natural heart. But His same wondrous love and grace, which has secured for us above an inalienably (defined; incapable of being alienated—NC) safe portion, blessings ordained from eternity and secured for eternity, have also to carry on a work within us. It is to be here below, in the school of tribulations, to enable us during our journey through this barren wilderness, to realize those blessings and to put away everything around or within us that would hinder or prevent our enjoyment of them (1Ti 6:17), and our corresponding faithful witness and godly walk.

Many might be inclined to think, “Perfect peace with God with regard to the past, and unchanging divine favor as to the present, and a secure hope of glory as the future, for all eternity—what do I want more?” Stop, there is something more! The Father, in His unsearchable wisdom, grace and love, has something else in store for you—not up there, but down here in the wilderness.

“And not only so, but we rejoice also in tribulations” (Ro 5:3). Certainly, it is something beautiful to rejoice in the hope of the glory of God. But to rejoice in tribulations (2Co 12:9, 10) is a very different thing. The Israelties sang a lofty song of praise to Jehovah, when He had led His people dry-shod through the Red Sea to the shore of safety and deliverance, after they had seen the returning waves covering Pharoah and his numberless chariots, horses and horsemen.

But what do we find at the end of the same chapter? Scarcely had the last note of that high triumphant song of redemption died away, when close upon its heels followed the murmuring, for “they came to Marah,” and “they could not drink of the waters of Marah, for they were bitter” (Exo 15:23-25). So did Israel, the earthly people of God. What about us, His heavenly people? “These things are written for our admonition, upon whom the ends of the ages are come” (1Co 10:11).

How much nearer, than that of Israel, our relationship is to the Father! How much higher and more perfect our position, our vocation, our hope; and how incomparably greater are our blessings than those of Israel! The difference is just as wide as that between heaven and earth. Have we, when coming to “Marah,” murmured like Israel? Or have we, perhaps, after having such a hymn of praise at the Lord’s Table, on the resurrection-day of our Lord, murmured the next hour, when coming to some bitter water?

It is a fine thing to rise above the pressure of circumstances in the power of faith; it is quite another thing, to bend in patience under them and learn that Christian endurance, which can only be made our own in the Father’s school of tribulations. Flesh (old man i.e. sin nature—NC) and nature do not relish the crucible, and to those who have not peace with God, the tempter often whispers: “God is against you; He deals as Judge with you for your sins, which proves that your sins are unforgiven and that you are not His child. This is only a foretaste of the eternal judgement awaiting you, if you should die with this illness, or if your heart should break under this crushing blow God has inflicted upon you.”

“Not at all,” says the child of God that enjoys peace with Him (regardless the conditions—NC). “My Father is for me, and for this very reason He has sent me these trials, ‘for whom the Lord loveth He chasteneth . . . for what son is he whom the father chasteneth not’ (Heb 12:6, 7; also Rev 3:19). He is dealing with me as a Father, not as a Judge!”

—William John Hocking (1864-1953)




Miles J Stanford devotional excerpt for 4/21:

“It is a great comfort to know that everything our Father takes us through—much of which may be hard and heartbreaking—has a dual purpose. That which He utilizes to cause us to grow spiritually is at the same time designed to prepare us for His service. He does nothing in vain; He wastes nothing.” -MJS

“In the very service itself God makes the servant fit to carry it out. A person is first disciplined for service, and then in the service he is made fit by it for the character of it. God has not servants ready-made. He makes them fit for His own service in connection with the race they have to run. The word ‘chasten’ is the same as that used in Ephesians with respect to bringing up the children: it is nurture. We attach too much the idea of severity, or retribution, to it.” -James Butler Stoney (1814-1897)

 
Active
Top Poster Of Month
For believers, everything encountered, even all that is self-originating is used for their good (Ro 8:28); which is for the purpose of being continually “conformed into the image of His Son” (v 9), via growing in their faith. Thusly is all that transpires in the lives of the saints which is sovereignly controlled, and each day can be welcomed thereby!

For our spiritual growth we must remember to “lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us,” and “Cast all your care upon Him” (Heb 12:1; 1Pe 5:7). Learning to do these two commands manifests the exercising of our faith towards always entrusting God with everything—especially concerning the “hardness,” which results in making us a “partaker of the afflictions of the gospel according to the power of God” (2Ti 2:3; 2Ti 1:8).
NC



Tribulations’ School


“Tribulation worketh patience” (Ro 5:3). The father’s school of tribulations is very distasteful to the natural heart. But His same wondrous love and grace, which has secured for us above an inalienably (defined; incapable of being alienated—NC) safe portion, blessings ordained from eternity and secured for eternity, have also to carry on a work within us. It is to be here below, in the school of tribulations, to enable us during our journey through this barren wilderness, to realize those blessings and to put away everything around or within us that would hinder or prevent our enjoyment of them (1Ti 6:17), and our corresponding faithful witness and godly walk.

Many might be inclined to think, “Perfect peace with God with regard to the past, and unchanging divine favor as to the present, and a secure hope of glory as the future, for all eternity—what do I want more?” Stop, there is something more! The Father, in His unsearchable wisdom, grace and love, has something else in store for you—not up there, but down here in the wilderness.

“And not only so, but we rejoice also in tribulations” (Ro 5:3). Certainly, it is something beautiful to rejoice in the hope of the glory of God. But to rejoice in tribulations (2Co 12:9, 10) is a very different thing. The Israelties sang a lofty song of praise to Jehovah, when He had led His people dry-shod through the Red Sea to the shore of safety and deliverance, after they had seen the returning waves covering Pharoah and his numberless chariots, horses and horsemen.

But what do we find at the end of the same chapter? Scarcely had the last note of that high triumphant song of redemption died away, when close upon its heels followed the murmuring, for “they came to Marah,” and “they could not drink of the waters of Marah, for they were bitter” (Exo 15:23-25). So did Israel, the earthly people of God. What about us, His heavenly people? “These things are written for our admonition, upon whom the ends of the ages are come” (1Co 10:11).

How much nearer, than that of Israel, our relationship is to the Father! How much higher and more perfect our position, our vocation, our hope; and how incomparably greater are our blessings than those of Israel! The difference is just as wide as that between heaven and earth. Have we, when coming to “Marah,” murmured like Israel? Or have we, perhaps, after having such a hymn of praise at the Lord’s Table, on the resurrection-day of our Lord, murmured the next hour, when coming to some bitter water?

It is a fine thing to rise above the pressure of circumstances in the power of faith; it is quite another thing, to bend in patience under them and learn that Christian endurance, which can only be made our own in the Father’s school of tribulations. Flesh (old man i.e. sin nature—NC) and nature do not relish the crucible, and to those who have not peace with God, the tempter often whispers: “God is against you; He deals as Judge with you for your sins, which proves that your sins are unforgiven and that you are not His child. This is only a foretaste of the eternal judgement awaiting you, if you should die with this illness, or if your heart should break under this crushing blow God has inflicted upon you.”

“Not at all,” says the child of God that enjoys peace with Him (regardless the conditions—NC). “My Father is for me, and for this very reason He has sent me these trials, ‘for whom the Lord loveth He chasteneth . . . for what son is he whom the father chasteneth not’ (Heb 12:6, 7; also Rev 3:19). He is dealing with me as a Father, not as a Judge!”

—William John Hocking (1864-1953)




Miles J Stanford devotional excerpt for 4/21:

“It is a great comfort to know that everything our Father takes us through—much of which may be hard and heartbreaking—has a dual purpose. That which He utilizes to cause us to grow spiritually is at the same time designed to prepare us for His service. He does nothing in vain; He wastes nothing.” -MJS

“In the very service itself God makes the servant fit to carry it out. A person is first disciplined for service, and then in the service he is made fit by it for the character of it. God has not servants ready-made. He makes them fit for His own service in connection with the race they have to run. The word ‘chasten’ is the same as that used in Ephesians with respect to bringing up the children: it is nurture. We attach too much the idea of severity, or retribution, to it.” -James Butler Stoney (1814-1897)

I am reminded daily the brevity of life in this fleshly vessel God has so graciously provided, and the timelessness of eternity that awaits. How glorious must it be that its fullness our minds are incapable of searching. I can endure for a season, but the same is but a whisper in the wind, a mist, a vapor, here for a moment and then the seamless transition to everlasting bliss before an everloving God.
 
Moderator
Staff Member
Greetings NC

and for you my Brother...


It is enough for the disciple that he be as his master, and the servant as his lord. If they have called the master of the house Beelzebub, how much more shall they call them of his household? Fear them not therefore: for there is nothing covered, that shall not be revealed; and hid, that shall not be known. – Matthew 10: 25,26


I have known the day when perplexities pleased me, dilemmas afforded me delight, and instead of declining a difficult task I rather like it. Even now I enjoy puzzling over a problem, and attempting what others decline. Nothing good in this world can be effected without difficulty. The biggest diamonds lie under heavy stones which sluggards cannot turn over. That which is easy to do is hardly worth doing. In the face of difficulty the man of ardent, persevering spirit braces up his nerves, sharpens his wits, and brings all his powers into play to achieve an object that will reward his efforts. Have you great difficulties dear friend? You are not the first worker for God who has had difficulties to encounter…Any good thing, I say, especially any good thing done for God, must be surrounded with difficulties, and resisted by adversaries. Look at Nehemiah, and Ezra, and Zerubbabel, and those that built Jerusalem, the second time. These good men wrought zealously, but Sanballat and Tobiah were jeering and jesting, and trying to throw down the wall. If you build a city without difficulty, it is not Jerusalem. Be sure of that. As soon as ever you begin working for God you will find a great power working against you. If you encounter opposition, take it as a good sign…When you, my dear brother, meet with opposition, encounter it with prayer. Exercise more faith. Antagonists ought never to hinder your going forward in the cause of Christ. Diamond must cut diamond. There is nothing so hard in this world but you can cut it with something harder. If you ask God to steel your soul up to the conquering point, and to make your resolution like an adamant stone, you can cut your way through an alp of diamond in the service of your Lord and Master.


Let me inspirit you in the face of assailants. The forces ranged against you might be stumbling-blocks to fools, but they shall only prove a stimulus to men. One day your honour shall be the greater and your reward shall be the higher because of these adverse elements. Therefore, be brave and fear not, but advance in the strength of God.

~ C.H. Spurgeon


Bless you ....><>
 
Active
Greetings NC

and for you my Brother...


It is enough for the disciple that he be as his master, and the servant as his lord. If they have called the master of the house Beelzebub, how much more shall they call them of his household? Fear them not therefore: for there is nothing covered, that shall not be revealed; and hid, that shall not be known. – Matthew 10: 25,26


I have known the day when perplexities pleased me, dilemmas afforded me delight, and instead of declining a difficult task I rather like it. Even now I enjoy puzzling over a problem, and attempting what others decline. Nothing good in this world can be effected without difficulty. The biggest diamonds lie under heavy stones which sluggards cannot turn over. That which is easy to do is hardly worth doing. In the face of difficulty the man of ardent, persevering spirit braces up his nerves, sharpens his wits, and brings all his powers into play to achieve an object that will reward his efforts. Have you great difficulties dear friend? You are not the first worker for God who has had difficulties to encounter…Any good thing, I say, especially any good thing done for God, must be surrounded with difficulties, and resisted by adversaries. Look at Nehemiah, and Ezra, and Zerubbabel, and those that built Jerusalem, the second time. These good men wrought zealously, but Sanballat and Tobiah were jeering and jesting, and trying to throw down the wall. If you build a city without difficulty, it is not Jerusalem. Be sure of that. As soon as ever you begin working for God you will find a great power working against you. If you encounter opposition, take it as a good sign…When you, my dear brother, meet with opposition, encounter it with prayer. Exercise more faith. Antagonists ought never to hinder your going forward in the cause of Christ. Diamond must cut diamond. There is nothing so hard in this world but you can cut it with something harder. If you ask God to steel your soul up to the conquering point, and to make your resolution like an adamant stone, you can cut your way through an alp of diamond in the service of your Lord and Master.


Let me inspirit you in the face of assailants. The forces ranged against you might be stumbling-blocks to fools, but they shall only prove a stimulus to men. One day your honour shall be the greater and your reward shall be the higher because of these adverse elements. Therefore, be brave and fear not, but advance in the strength of God.

~ C.H. Spurgeon


Bless you ....><>
Hi Brother and appreciate the above-average selection from Spurgeon! Not very long ago I learned that everything believers encounter, whether from within or without, it will only be used by the great Orchestrator for our good, and this cannot be hindered by self or others.

God's blessings to you too!
 

Similar threads

Top