• Welcome to Talk Jesus

    A true bible based, Christ centered community forums.

    Join over 10,000 worldwide members today

    Register Log In

  • Hi Guest!

    I've added a brand new "Night Mode" option to our site design. I'd greatly appreciate your vote on this poll here.

    To switch to night mode (or back to light/default theme) simply click on the "Site Menu" icon on top and on the dropdown choose "Switch to Night Mode" or "Switch to Light Mode"

    Thank you.

Self-Serve Christianity

Users who viewed this discussion (Total:0)

Moderator
Staff member
Forgive me a moment of nostalgic reminiscence... Remember the days when the proprietor at the mercantile, the clerk at the grocery market and the attendant at the gas-station would take the time to really "serve" the customer? They regarded pleasant, helpful service to be their primary responsibility, whereby they might maintain loyal, satisfied customers. Their mottoes were displayed on the wall: "Service with a smile." "The customer is always right."

Today, ours is a society of convenience stores, fast-foods and self-service. Aptly referred to as the "Me-generation," we want just what we want, and we want it "now" for the least price.

Ours is the age of supermarket shopping. We choose the product of our choice from a selection of multitudinous varieties. Willing to purchase not only what we need but almost everything we want, we expect to find everything at one location and a complete stock of every variety. We prefer that it be on "sale," or at least have a rebate, for we refuse to pay the full price. Our busy schedules mean we are always in a rush. We resent having to wait; we expect immediate service. Increasingly we are demanding that the commodities be delivered to our door.

Remember when our mothers and grandmothers would shop at the local grocery for fresh food items, or go down into the food cellar to get "canned" food items from the previous season? They would spend hours, sometimes days, preparing meals for the family and friends. Mealtimes were a time of meaningful family fellowship and personal interaction.

Fewer and fewer family meals are prepared today. When mealtime approaches we pile in the car to drive to restaurant row. "Let's take a vote. What sounds good to us today?" Sampling the delicacies of the innumerable food preparation establishments, we cater to whatever suits our "taste" at the moment. There are ethnic emphases, culinary specialties, a smorgasbord to appease every appetite.

Needing fuel for the automobile, we stop at the gas station. Remember how the friendly attendant used to come out and check the oil and water, wash the windows and pump the gas? We even used to call it a "service station." Few are willing to pay the additional price for full-service anymore. Instead we pull up to the "self-serve" island to "pump and pay." Having taken on fuel for the week, we drive off in a hurry to the next convenient, self-serve satisfaction of our every desire.
____________

It is not difficult to liken the foregoing shift in consumerism to the contemporary ecclesiastical situation. This is the age of "supermarket Christianity" where we shop around for the commodities we desire. Though unwilling to "pay the price," we demand satisfaction of every perceived need and immediate delivery.


The institutional church has catered to such consumer Christianity by attempting to offer a smorgasbord of every delicacy on restaurant row. "Where shall we go to get 'fed' today?" Some even conceive of a gas-station Christianity where people can "pump and pay" for a weekly spiritual "fill-up."

Whether it be the pleasant personal service of the past or the self-service style of the present, the entire concept of a consumer-oriented Christianity must be challenged. Are we consumers demanding to be served, or are we Christians, indwelt by Jesus Christ, living and loving to serve the needs of others?

Self-service Christianity is an abomination! Let us return to real Christian service with a smile.



from: Self-serve Christianity parody
 
Loyal Member
thats great and I so often bring up the old days when me and my dad would go to the local hardware store that was family run and owned. We go there on sat mornings and my dad and the owner would speak as real friends speak. Compared to now a-days you go Lowes and corporate owned and the employees run from when you need help LOL.

Never thought of how that relates to the mega church with there feel good messages and watered down gospels. But I can see it has progressed right along with everything else.

Great insight Bear thanks for the share
 
Moderator
Staff member
Greetings Dave,

I think it also goes for lots of little brand name and even non-denominational brand name 'churches' .

You can even order and enjoy your meal online now, too. I know of an older man who does this and it is very sad to hear him praise the whole thing with real conviction that it's good.
Then there is the TV snack variety.

Bless you Brother ....><>
 
Loyal Member
Forgive me a moment of nostalgic reminiscence... Remember the days when the proprietor at the mercantile, the clerk at the grocery market and the attendant at the gas-station would take the time to really "serve" the customer? They regarded pleasant, helpful service to be their primary responsibility, whereby they might maintain loyal, satisfied customers. Their mottoes were displayed on the wall: "Service with a smile." "The customer is always right."

Today, ours is a society of convenience stores, fast-foods and self-service. Aptly referred to as the "Me-generation," we want just what we want, and we want it "now" for the least price.

Ours is the age of supermarket shopping. We choose the product of our choice from a selection of multitudinous varieties. Willing to purchase not only what we need but almost everything we want, we expect to find everything at one location and a complete stock of every variety. We prefer that it be on "sale," or at least have a rebate, for we refuse to pay the full price. Our busy schedules mean we are always in a rush. We resent having to wait; we expect immediate service. Increasingly we are demanding that the commodities be delivered to our door.

Remember when our mothers and grandmothers would shop at the local grocery for fresh food items, or go down into the food cellar to get "canned" food items from the previous season? They would spend hours, sometimes days, preparing meals for the family and friends. Mealtimes were a time of meaningful family fellowship and personal interaction.

Fewer and fewer family meals are prepared today. When mealtime approaches we pile in the car to drive to restaurant row. "Let's take a vote. What sounds good to us today?" Sampling the delicacies of the innumerable food preparation establishments, we cater to whatever suits our "taste" at the moment. There are ethnic emphases, culinary specialties, a smorgasbord to appease every appetite.

Needing fuel for the automobile, we stop at the gas station. Remember how the friendly attendant used to come out and check the oil and water, wash the windows and pump the gas? We even used to call it a "service station." Few are willing to pay the additional price for full-service anymore. Instead we pull up to the "self-serve" island to "pump and pay." Having taken on fuel for the week, we drive off in a hurry to the next convenient, self-serve satisfaction of our every desire.
____________

It is not difficult to liken the foregoing shift in consumerism to the contemporary ecclesiastical situation. This is the age of "supermarket Christianity" where we shop around for the commodities we desire. Though unwilling to "pay the price," we demand satisfaction of every perceived need and immediate delivery.


The institutional church has catered to such consumer Christianity by attempting to offer a smorgasbord of every delicacy on restaurant row. "Where shall we go to get 'fed' today?" Some even conceive of a gas-station Christianity where people can "pump and pay" for a weekly spiritual "fill-up."

Whether it be the pleasant personal service of the past or the self-service style of the present, the entire concept of a consumer-oriented Christianity must be challenged. Are we consumers demanding to be served, or are we Christians, indwelt by Jesus Christ, living and loving to serve the needs of others?

Self-service Christianity is an abomination! Let us return to real Christian service with a smile.



from: Self-serve Christianity parody
Just as people separate themselves more from other people in these latter days, one may find the same in churches in being further separated from the Lord Jesus Christ in getting to know Him & the power of His resurrection in their daily lives when they have their eyes taken off of seeking the face of the Lord in worship to seeking a supernatural filling by a sign when they had been filled since they had been saved at the calling of the gospel when they had believed in Jesus Christ.

Too many foolish virgins out to the market seeking to be filled where the prudent virgins know they had been filled since they had been saved and thus, are abiding in Him as "ready" for the Bridegroom when He comes.
 
S
Guest

Forgive me a moment of nostalgic reminiscence... Remember the days when the proprietor at the mercantile, the clerk at the grocery market and the attendant at the gas-station would take the time to really "serve" the customer? They regarded pleasant, helpful service to be their primary responsibility, whereby they might maintain loyal, satisfied customers. Their mottoes were displayed on the wall: "Service with a smile." "The customer is always right."

Today, ours is a society of convenience stores, fast-foods and self-service. Aptly referred to as the "Me-generation," we want just what we want, and we want it "now" for the least price.

Ours is the age of supermarket shopping. We choose the product of our choice from a selection of multitudinous varieties. Willing to purchase not only what we need but almost everything we want, we expect to find everything at one location and a complete stock of every variety. We prefer that it be on "sale," or at least have a rebate, for we refuse to pay the full price. Our busy schedules mean we are always in a rush. We resent having to wait; we expect immediate service. Increasingly we are demanding that the commodities be delivered to our door.

Remember when our mothers and grandmothers would shop at the local grocery for fresh food items, or go down into the food cellar to get "canned" food items from the previous season? They would spend hours, sometimes days, preparing meals for the family and friends. Mealtimes were a time of meaningful family fellowship and personal interaction.

Fewer and fewer family meals are prepared today. When mealtime approaches we pile in the car to drive to restaurant row. "Let's take a vote. What sounds good to us today?" Sampling the delicacies of the innumerable food preparation establishments, we cater to whatever suits our "taste" at the moment. There are ethnic emphases, culinary specialties, a smorgasbord to appease every appetite.

Needing fuel for the automobile, we stop at the gas station. Remember how the friendly attendant used to come out and check the oil and water, wash the windows and pump the gas? We even used to call it a "service station." Few are willing to pay the additional price for full-service anymore. Instead we pull up to the "self-serve" island to "pump and pay." Having taken on fuel for the week, we drive off in a hurry to the next convenient, self-serve satisfaction of our every desire.
____________

It is not difficult to liken the foregoing shift in consumerism to the contemporary ecclesiastical situation. This is the age of "supermarket Christianity" where we shop around for the commodities we desire. Though unwilling to "pay the price," we demand satisfaction of every perceived need and immediate delivery.


The institutional church has catered to such consumer Christianity by attempting to offer a smorgasbord of every delicacy on restaurant row. "Where shall we go to get 'fed' today?" Some even conceive of a gas-station Christianity where people can "pump and pay" for a weekly spiritual "fill-up."

Whether it be the pleasant personal service of the past or the self-service style of the present, the entire concept of a consumer-oriented Christianity must be challenged. Are we consumers demanding to be served, or are we Christians, indwelt by Jesus Christ, living and loving to serve the needs of others?

Self-service Christianity is an abomination! Let us return to real Christian service with a smile.



from: Self-serve Christianity parody
This is a good write up. I think you are correct. Most Christians nowadays are not concern on serving the spiritual needs of others, rather they are concentrated on solving their personal needs. Remember, Jesus was always solving people's problems without even thinking of what he was passing through. There are many Christians who want to follow the true teaching of Jesus Christ, but because of self service Christianity as our brother has mentioned above, they do not listen to the spiritual needs of others. I pray that God will open our eyes to consider one another in love.
sam.
 

Similar threads

Top