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Rechabites question

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Hi all,

I've been interested in going through the bible chronologically and looking at Jesus' lineage along the way. I'm just past Jeremiah 35 and there is a story about the Rechabites, which my bible calls a clan that is "a survival from the Nomadic days, represented a reaction against urban civilization in favor of the ancient religious practices of the desert," then references the prophet Hosea - 2:16

Did a little research online, but didn't find anything conclusive, other than the clan is related to Jonadab, son of Rechab. I was just wondering if Rechab was a descendant of one of the 12 tribes and if so, which one? One of the sites referenced Enoch, which would put the clan way before Jacob- before the flood even, and since Enoch is Noah's great grandfather- it just doesn't make sense to me.

If anyone happens to know about this, that'd be great!




a little :confused: , but still in
fww
 
Member
Rechab belonged to a branch of the Kenites settled from the first at Jabez of Judah, but probably belonged to Israel rather than Judah. He may or may not have been the Father of the Rechabites.

If you can find a cyclopedia of Biblical Theology and Ecclesastical Literature, I'm sure you will get more than enough info. I used the McClintock and Stong Cycopedia.
 
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Member
One of the sites referenced Enoch, which would put the clan way before Jacob- before the flood even, and since Enoch is Noah's great grandfather- it just doesn't make sense to me.
Are you sure they were refering to the person Enoch, maybe it was the book Enoch. Which I think dates somewhere inbetween 144 - 120 B.C. aprox.
 
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Hi jiggyfly,

Thanks! - and for the reference book suggestions too.

I didn't even know there was a book of Enoch, I bet that must have been it. I'll have to look into that too, when I get closer to 144. (right now still in the early 600s-late500s.)
 

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