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"Let This Cup Pass from Me..." What Did Jesus Mean?

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Luke 22:39-44

Jesus Prays on the Mount of Olives
39 Jesus went out as usual to the Mount of Olives, and his disciples followed him. 40 On reaching the place, he said to them, “Pray that you will not fall into temptation.” 41 He withdrew about a stone’s throw beyond them, knelt down and prayed, 42 “Father, if you are willing, take this cup from me; yet not my will, but yours be done.” 43 An angel from heaven appeared to him and strengthened him. 44 And being in anguish, he prayed more earnestly, and his sweat was like drops of blood falling to the ground.

So what is the "cup" He was referring to? Did He change His mind about wanting to die on the Cross? The cup Jesus was referring to is the separation from the Father. Jesus (Son) and the Father were always, eternally together and never separated. On the Cross, Jesus bore the sins of the world, including the spiritual separation of everyone who would reject Him. Remember on the Cross, Jesus said "why has thou forsaken Me?" (Matthew 27:46)

RSB Study Note

this cup. A symbol of suffering and divine anger (Is. 51:17; Ezek. 23:33).

not my will. As One who had taken upon Himself a complete human nature, it was natural for Jesus to shrink from the horror of the Cross, a horror magnified by His knowledge that in dying He would be forsaken by God and experience the weight of divine anger on sin. Nevertheless, Jesus is determined to follow the will of His Father.

Matthew Henry Commentary

There are three things in this passage which we had not in the other evangelists:—

1. That, when Christ was in his agony, there appeared to him an angel from heaven, strengthening him, Luke 22:43.

1. It was an instance of the deep humiliation of our Lord Jesus that he needed the assistance of an angel, and would admit it. The influence of the divine nature withdrew for the present, and then, as to his human nature, he was for a little while lower than the angels, and was capable of receiving help from them.

2. When he was not delivered from his sufferings, yet he was strengthened and supported under them, and that was equivalent. If God proportion the shoulders to the burden, we shall have no reason to complain, whatever he is pleased to lay upon us. David owns this a sufficient answer to his prayer, in the day of trouble, that God strengthened him with strength in his soul, and so does the son of David, Ps. 138:3.

3. The angels ministered to the Lord Jesus in his sufferings. He could have had legions of them to rescue him; nay, this one could have done it, could have chased and conquered the whole band of men that came to take him; but he made use of his ministration only to strengthen him; and the very visit which this angel made him now in his grief, when his enemies were awake and his friends asleep, was such a seasonable token of the divine favour as would be a very great strengthening to him. Yet this was not all: he probably said something to him to strengthen him; put him in mind that his sufferings were in order to his Father’s glory, to his own glory, and to the salvation of those that were given him, represented to him the joy set before him, the seed he should see; with these and the like suggestions he encouraged him to go on cheerfully; and what is comforting is strengthening. Perhaps he did something to strengthen him, wiped away his sweat and tears, perhaps ministered some cordial to him, as after his temptation, or, it may be, took him by the arm, and helped him off the ground, or bore him up when he was ready to faint away; and in these services of the angel the Holy Spirit was enischyon autonputting strength into him; for so the word signifies. It pleased the Lord to bruise him indeed; yet did he plead against him with his great power? No, but he put strength in him (Job 23:6), as he had promised, Ps. 89:21; Isa. 49:8; 50:7.​

2. That, being in an agony, he prayed more earnestly, Luke 22:44.
As his sorrow and trouble grew upon him, he grew more importunate in prayer; not that there was before any coldness or indifferency in his prayers, but there was now a greater vehemency in them, which was expressed in his voice and gesture. Note, Prayer, though never out of season, is in a special manner seasonable when we are in an agony; and the stronger our agonies are the more lively and frequent our prayers should be. Now it was that Christ offered up prayers and supplications with strong crying and tears, and was heard in that he feared (Heb. 5:7), and in his fear wrestled, as Jacob with the angel.

3. That, in this agony, his sweat was as it were great drops of blood falling down to the ground.
Sweat came in with sin, and was a branch of the curse, Gen. 3:19. And therefore, when Christ was made sin and a curse for us, he underwent a grievous sweat, that in the sweat of his face we might eat bread, and that he might sanctify and sweeten all our trials to us. There is some dispute among the critics whether this sweat is only compared to drops of blood, being much thicker than drops of sweat commonly are, the pores of the body being more than ordinarily opened, or whether real blood out of the capillary veins mingled with it, so that it was in colour like blood, and might truly be called a bloody sweat; the matter is not great. Some reckon this one of the times when Christ shed his blood for us, for without the shedding of blood there is no remission. Every pore was as it were a bleeding wound, and his blood stained all his raiment. This showed the travail of his soul. He was now abroad in the open air, in a cool season, upon the cold ground, far in the night, which, one would think, had been enough to strike in a sweat; yet now he breaks out into a sweat, which bespeaks the extremity of the agony he was in.

John Gill's Exposition of Luke 22:42


Saying, Father, if thou be willing

If it be consistent with thy will of saving sinners, and which thou hast declared to me, and I have undertook to perform: the other evangelists say, "if it be possible"; (See Gill on Matthew 26:39) remove this cup from me;
meaning, either his present sorrows and distress, or his approaching sufferings and death, which he had in view, or both:

nevertheless not my will;
as man, for Christ had an human will distinct from, though not contrary to his divine will: but thine be done;
which Christ undertook, and came into this world to do; and it was his meat and drink to do it, and was the same with his own will, as the Son of God; (See Gill on Matthew 26:39), and (See Gill on Matthew 26:42).
 
Active

RJ

Remember on the Cross, Jesus said "why has thou forsaken Me?" (Matthew 27:46)
There is no way that we can come close to understanding how he suffered for us!
About the "Why has thou forsaken me" verse. I actually believe that it was God's plan to back away from Jesus on the cross so he could complete the sacrifice alone.
I believe that Jesus missed his divine presence while he completed his mission!.....a more perfect sacrifice!
 
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Link to this
Luke 9:28-31 (KJV)
28 And it came to pass about an eight days after these sayings, he took Peter and John and James, and went up into a mountain to pray.
29 And as he prayed, the fashion of his countenance was altered, and his raiment was white and glistering.
30 And, behold, there talked with him two men, which were Moses and Elias:
31 Who appeared in glory, and spake of his decease which he should accomplish at Jerusalem.


Jesus received details of the plan of God. Then like hearing the Father's voice of confirmation at Jesus' baptism in the Jordan, the same voice confirms what had transpired. There he had Moses, Elijah, and the Father attesting concerning his future.
Luke 9:33-36 (KJV)
33 And it came to pass, as they departed from him, Peter said unto Jesus, Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make three tabernacles; one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias: not knowing what he said.
34 While he thus spake, there came a cloud, and overshadowed them: and they feared as they entered into the cloud.
35 And there came a voice out of the cloud, saying, This is my beloved Son: hear him.
36 And when the voice was past, Jesus was found alone. And they kept it close, and told no man in those days any of those things which they had seen.


I take it that Jesus had very specific instructions from Heaven, leaving no mystery about the manner of his death. When a soldier receives orders that mean his certain death, his humanity should cry out "Is there not another plan that would work out as good? " He is likely to appeal in some appreciated way, a commander also being human and understanding. But a higher will must be carried out. I take that experience of Jesus to teach me hat God might issue a very hard task, and he tolerates questioning and appeal for some other decision, but highly honors obedience of doing his will. God left Jesus' choice in his mortal human hands, the same as for all of us.
 
Member
This passage needs to be seen in the context of Passover and the Passover meal. The Passover Meal is a metaphor of God's deep investment to bring Israel and humanity into a Paradise restored with the fulness of His presence. The significance of the third cup of the Passover meal is that it is the cup of Suffering for the purpose of redemption. The 4th cup is the final cup and is the cup of In-Gathering. This 4th cup is the cup that we await to drink from when the Messiah returns and the in-gathering that started in Genisis 3 is brought to completion in the fulness of time and completes all time. When Jesus speaks of "this cup" passing from Him in dialog with the Father, He is speaking of the third cup. The final statement, through the Father's silence to His request, is that the restoration and well-being of humanity's eternity hinged on the Messiah and the Messiah alone drinking the cup that was filled with suffering, or more to the fact, God's wrath. This brings Communion into it's true brilliance; in that, our drinking from this third cup, from an examined and repentant heart and mind, is our celebration of the magnificance of Messiah and recognition that our glorious God has made a way to amend the sufferings we have caused, and stayed our awaiting deserved divine sufferings that were ours to bare outside of the Messiah's work of drinking the third cup through the Cross.
 
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RJ

What was in the cup?

The wrath of Almighty God.
Yes, and God could not remove that cup, nor was he present, Jesus had to bear the wrath alone. That is why we have no idea what he accomplished!
 
Loyal
1. Luke 22:39-44

Jesus Prays on the Mount of Olives
39 Jesus went out as usual to the Mount of Olives, and his disciples followed him. 40 On reaching the place, he said to them, “Pray that you will not fall into temptation.” 41 He withdrew about a stone’s throw beyond them, knelt down and prayed, 42 “Father, if you are willing, take this cup from me; yet not my will, but yours be done.” 43 An angel from heaven appeared to him and strengthened him. 44 And being in anguish, he prayed more earnestly, and his sweat was like drops of blood falling to the ground.



So what is the "cup" He was referring to? Did He change His mind about wanting to die on the Cross? The cup Jesus was referring to is the separation from the Father. Jesus (Son) and the Father were always, eternally together and never separated. On the Cross, Jesus bore the sins of the world, including the spiritual separation of everyone who would reject Him. Remember on the Cross, Jesus said "why has thou forsaken Me?" (Matthew 27:46)
And Jesus asked Zebedee’s children: Are ye able to drink of THE CUP that I shall drink of, and to be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with? They say unto him, We are able.” Matt 20:22

And Jesus confirmed that part of their response:

“And he saith unto them, Ye shall drink indeed of my cup,” Matt 20:23

Does that apply also to you and me today? Do we also have to drink of Jesus’ cup?

RSB Study Note

this cup. A symbol of suffering and divine anger (Is. 51:17; Ezek. 23:33).

not my will. As One who had taken upon Himself a complete human nature, it was natural for Jesus to shrink from the horror of the Cross, a horror magnified by His knowledge that in dying He would be forsaken by God and experience the weight of divine anger on sin. Nevertheless, Jesus is determined to follow the will of His Father.
A cup is simply a vessel that holds something. It may hold coffee or milk or water or it may hold for us, or as it did for Jesus, suffering and pain.

Matthew Henry Commentary

2. That, being in an agony, he prayed more earnestly, Luke 22:44.
As his sorrow and trouble grew upon him, he grew more importunate in prayer; not that there was before any coldness or indifferency in his prayers, but there was now a greater vehemency in them, which was expressed in his voice and gesture. Note, Prayer, though never out of season, is in a special manner seasonable when we are in an agony; and the stronger our agonies are the more lively and frequent our prayers should be. Now it was that Christ offered up prayers and supplications with strong crying and tears, and was heard in that he feared (Heb. 5:7), and in his fear wrestled, as Jacob with the angel.

As Paul put it, we are to “pray without ceasing”. This is one of those impossible things, but it is nonetheless a very necessary thing. The impossibility is for man trying to do it alone. For God in us, is anything impossible?

3. That, in this agony, his sweat was as it were great drops of blood falling down to the ground.
Sweat came in with sin, and was a branch of the curse, Gen. 3:19. And therefore, when Christ was made sin and a curse for us, he underwent a grievous sweat, that in the sweat of his face we might eat bread, and that he might sanctify and sweeten all our trials to us. There is some dispute among the critics whether this sweat is only compared to drops of blood, being much thicker than drops of sweat commonly are, the pores of the body being more than ordinarily opened, or whether real blood out of the capillary veins mingled with it, so that it was in colour like blood, and might truly be called a bloody sweat; the matter is not great. Some reckon this one of the times when Christ shed his blood for us, for without the shedding of blood there is no remission. Every pore was as it were a bleeding wound, and his blood stained all his raiment. This showed the travail of his soul. He was now abroad in the open air, in a cool season, upon the cold ground, far in the night, which, one would think, had been enough to strike in a sweat; yet now he breaks out into a sweat, which bespeaks the extremity of the agony he was in.

John Gill's Exposition of Luke 22:42


Saying, Father, if thou be willing

If it be consistent with thy will of saving sinners, and which thou hast declared to me, and I have undertook to perform: the other evangelists say, "if it be possible"; (See Gill on Matthew 26:39) remove this cup from me;
meaning, either his present sorrows and distress, or his approaching sufferings and death, which he had in view, or both:

nevertheless not my will;
as man, for Christ had an human will distinct from, though not contrary to his divine will: but thine be done;
which Christ undertook, and came into this world to do; and it was his meat and drink to do it, and was the same with his own will, as the Son of God; (See Gill on Matthew 26:39), and (See Gill on Matthew 26:42).

What I see in his prayer repeated three times in the garden of Gethsemene is Jesus overcoming the last obstacle in his world. After Gethsemene would come this verse:


“These things I have spoken unto you, that in me ye might have peace. In the world ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have overcome the world.” John 16:33


Jesus did not overcome the world men call planet earth. He overcame what is described here:


“For all that is in the world, the lust of the flesh, and the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life, is not of the Father, but is of the world.” I John 2:16


Again the lust of the flesh, the lust of the eyes and the pride of life are not floating around loose on planet earth. They are in each world of each man born to woman.


Jesus overcome his own world of fleshly temptations and he provided the means for each of us overcome ours.
 
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Jesus overcome his own world of fleshly temptations and he provided the means for each of us overcome ours.
Is that all though?

What I mean: is Jesus's accomplishment just that he overcame the flesh and the world? That's definitely a big thing, more than I can do. But is that it, is that the sum of of what Christ accomplished on the tree?

Blessings,

Travis
 
Loyal
Is that all though?

What I mean: is Jesus's accomplishment just that he overcame the flesh and the world? That's definitely a big thing, more than I can do. But is that it, is that the sum of of what Christ accomplished on the tree?

Blessings,

Travis
Jesus overcame the ways of death in himself and brought Life to us. He was then the prepared and ready sacrifice, the sacrifice able to pay the price, which no other man could pay for himself. He provided the means for each of us to overcome the ways of death in us: He became the Door, to enter into Life. Who can enter through the gate to the garden, which was guarded to keep defiled from the Tree of Life? Clean us up and renew us O Lord with all the armour of God so that we can pass by the flaming sword to approach and partake of the fruit of that Tree.

What will each of us have to go through on our way to Life? What is our cup that we must drink to accomplish God's purpose for us according to His plan?
 
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1 John 3:8 (KJV) 8 He that committeth sin is of the devil; for the devil sinneth from the beginning. For this purpose the Son of God was manifested, that he might destroy the works of the devil.
 
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RJ

1 John 3:8 (KJV) 8 He that committeth sin is of the devil; for the devil sinneth from the beginning. For this purpose the Son of God was manifested, that he might destroy the works of the devil.
What does this have to do with the common thread:
"Let This Cup Pass from Me..." What Did Jesus Mean?
 
Loyal
Jesus knew what what was coming. ( Matt 26:2; Luke 18:32-33; )
Could there be a more painful way to die? Sometimes knowing what is coming makes it worse.
Still Jesus didn't have to do it. He had the power to prevent it. ( Matt 26:53; )
I think 12,000 angels could have handled a mob of 100 men or so pretty easily.
I know of no where else in the Bible Jesus' love for us is shown so clearly ( John 15:13; )
He didn't have to die, he He didn't deserve to die, He didn't want to die... but yet He did. For two reasons.
First He loved the Father enough to be that obedient to Him (I wonder if any of us would be that obedient?)
Second, He loved us enough the takes the penalty of our sins upon Himself. He who knew no sin, became sin and took our sins upon Himself. ( 1 Pet 2:24; )
Now THAT my friend... is love.
Even that the Father would be willing to have His own Son die for something He was not guilty of..... for us.
THAT my friend... is also love.

Jesus didn't want this.... He didn't want it so bad He was sweating blood ( Luke 22:43-44; )
But He loved the Father and us.. more than He hated death. THAT my friend, is amazing grace.
 
Member
What does this have to do with the common thread:
"Let This Cup Pass from Me..." What Did Jesus Mean?
Christ is saying to The Father, "if you are wiling, don't make me do this"
(suffer for the sins of the world). The part that is not being so much spoken of is what Christ said next: "nevertheless, not my will, but thine be done."

This passage reveals the entire nature of the Messiah.
As he said to his disciples before this prayer: "The Spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak." His asking The Father to "take this cup from me" is evidence of His flesh. His statement which affirms his obedience, "nevertheless not my will but thine be done" is
evidence of the even more abundant Spirit. As it is written of the Messiah hundreds of years before His manifestation. "And the Spirit of the Lord shall rest upon Him." (Isa 11:2)
 
Member
The fact that God caused Jesus to continue to the cross shows us that there was no other way for mankind to be saved.
 
Active
What does this have to do with the common thread:
"Let This Cup Pass from Me..." What Did Jesus Mean?
My post was not directed to anyone in particular, but to address some community comments that are shaping this thread.
 
Active
Christ is saying to The Father, "if you are wiling, don't make me do this"
(suffer for the sins of the world). The part that is not being so much spoken of is what Christ said next: "nevertheless, not my will, but thine be done."

This passage reveals the entire nature of the Messiah.
As he said to his disciples before this prayer: "The Spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak." His asking The Father to "take this cup from me" is evidence of His flesh. His statement which affirms his obedience, "nevertheless not my will but thine be done" is
evidence of the even more abundant Spirit. As it is written of the Messiah hundreds of years before His manifestation. "And the Spirit of the Lord shall rest upon Him." (Isa 11:2)
Indeed, Jesus submitted to Father God, who sent Moses and Elijah while Jesus was transfigured (what a magnificent experience for any human?), and again when the angel came to comfort him, that his task was to complete the plan of salvation. His humanity "side" rose up questioning God, but Jesus demonstrated it is possible to overcome the flesh and then obey God.
 

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