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Fruit of the Holy Spirit. What Are They?

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Galatians 5:22-23
But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control; against such things there is no law.

Fruit of the Spirit - Visible Growth in Jesus Christ
"Fruit of the Spirit" is a biblical term that sums up the nine visible attributes of a true Christian life. Using the King James Version of Galatians 5:22-23, these attributes are: love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness and temperance. We learn from scripture that these are not individual "fruits" from which we pick and choose. Rather, the fruit of the Spirit is one ninefold "fruit" that characterizes all who truly walk in the Holy Spirit. Collectively, these are the fruits that all Christians should be producing in their new lives with Jesus Christ.

Fruit of the Spirit - The Nine Biblical Attributes
The fruit of the Spirit is a physical manifestation of a Christian's transformed life. In order to mature as believers, we should study and understand the attributes of the ninefold fruit:

Love - "And so we know and rely on the love God has for us. God is love. Whoever lives in love lives in God, and God in him" (1 John 4:16). Through Jesus Christ, our greatest goal is to do all things in love. "Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres. Love never fails" (1 Corinthians 13:4-8).

Joy - "The joy of the Lord is your strength" (Nehemiah 8:10). "Let us fix our eyes on Jesus, the author and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy set before him endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God" (Hebrews 12:2).

Peace - "Therefore, since we have been justified through faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ" (Romans 5:1). "May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you trust in him, so that you may overflow with hope by the power of the Holy Spirit" (Romans 15:13).

Longsuffering (patience) -- We are "strengthened with all might, according to his glorious power, unto all patience and longsuffering with joyfulness" (Colossians 1:11). "With all lowliness and meekness, with longsuffering, forbearing one another in love" (Ephesians 4:2).

Gentleness (kindness) -- We should live "in purity, understanding, patience and kindness; in the Holy Spirit and in sincere love; in truthful speech and in the power of God; with weapons of righteousness in the right hand and in the left" (2 Corinthians 6:6-7).

Goodness - "Wherefore also we pray always for you, that our God would count you worthy of this calling, and fulfill all the good pleasure of his goodness, and the work of faith with power" (2 Thessalonians 1:11). "For the fruit of the Spirit is in all goodness and righteousness and truth" (Ephesians 5:9).

Faith (faithfulness) - "O Lord, thou art my God; I will exalt thee, I will praise thy name; for thou hast done wonderful things; thy counsels of old are faithfulness and truth" (Isaiah 25:1). "I pray that out of his glorious riches he may strengthen you with power through his Spirit in your inner being, so that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith" (Ephesians 3:16-17).

Meekness - "Brethren, if a man be overtaken in a fault, ye which are spiritual, restore such an one in the spirit of meekness; considering thyself, lest thou also be tempted" (Galatians 6:1). "With all lowliness and meekness, with longsuffering, forbearing one another in love" (Ephesians 4:2).

Temperance (self-control) - "But also for this very reason, giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue, to virtue knowledge, to knowledge self-control, to self-control perseverance, to perseverance godliness, to godliness brotherly kindness, and to brotherly kindness love" (2 Peter 1:5-7).

Fruit of the Spirit - A Devotional for All Christians
The fruit of the Spirit is a wonderful study for Christians at any level of spiritual maturity. We hope this website provides a thought-provoking devotional and a springboard for growth.

above portion from Fruit Of The Spirit

NIV Application Commentary

Paul’s listing of the “fruit of the Spirit” does not seem to have any particular order, though some have proposed an order. J. R. W. Stott sees in these nine virtues three groups of three: attitudes to God, others, and self, while J. B. Lightfoot sees dispositions of the mind, qualities governing human relations, and principles of conduct. We do need to comment on the terms fruit and love, but we are not able to spend time with each word.

Paul describes “flesh” under the term works, while he sees the Spirit’s work as “fruit.” The former is plural while the latter is singular. Is there anything significant in the change of terms or the change of number? Above all, it must be observed that works has been a term of negative associations in Galatians and that Paul probably delighted in associating the “works” of the flesh with the “works of the law” (2:16; 3:2, 5, 10). The change of terms to “fruit” evokes a different image: from one of human responsibility to one of divine enablement. The image of fruit has a certain sense of passivity to it; it is the Spirit of God who produces such things, and they grow in the life of the Christian.

However, while this may be one reason for the change of terms, it is also clear that Paul sees evil as having fruit (6:8) and thinks that the Christian is responsible to let the Spirit be operative in his or her life. Note that Paul shoulders the responsibility of the Spirit’s fruit onto the Christian: “have crucified their flesh” (v. 24), “let us keep in step” (v. 25), and “let us not become conceited” (v. 26)—not to mention verses 13, 16, and 18. It is possible that the unity of the fruit is emphasized in the singular while the chaotic multitude of sins of the flesh is represented in a plural noun. On the other hand, “fruit” can be seen as a collective plural; if so, there is nothing significant in the change to a singular.

While “love” is not the only “fruit” of the Spirit, it is the most important to Paul (cf. vv. 6, 13–14; also Rom. 5:5; 1 Cor. 13; Col. 3:14). It summarizes the demand of God’s law (Gal. 5:14), endures forever (1 Cor 13:13), and unites all the virtues of life (Col. 3:14). Fundamental to Paul’s view, however, is that love comes from God’s Spirit (cf. Rom. 5:5). Moreover, as we look over this list, we observe the reverse of the list of the works of the flesh. Whereas the flesh destroys fellowship; here the Spirit creates fellowship, unity, and holiness.

As if summarizing his whole point, Paul says that (1) those who have surrendered themselves to Jesus Christ “have crucified the flesh” and so should not be involved in the works of the flesh (v. 24); (2) those who have been given God’s life by the Spirit and Christ (cf. 2:20; Rom 8:9–11) should march according to the Spirit’s orders (Gal 5:25); and (3) those who live in the freedom of the Spirit should not be conceited and so fight with one another (v. 26). Once again, we end up with Paul’s emphasis in this context: Galatian factionalism.
 
Active
Interesting,

I've always been taught that The fruit of the spirit is singular. There is one fruit of the spirit. There are multiple parts to that fruit though, like an orange, or a clementine.

Idk,

Travis
 
Member
I think the term fruit is a perfect description (good or bad) of something that starts as a seed into something ripe and juicy (sweet or bitter). Then it drops to the earth (buried) and the fruit fertilizes the seed to become transfigured into something else, a plant. Spiritually, depending on what we feed ourselves with, our fruit (good or bad) will transfigure into whatever the seed of that fruit becomes. My wish is that my fruit will be sweet and juicy for Christ and God to enjoy. (just an analogy).
 
Active

RJ

Galatians 5:22-23
But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control; against such things there is no law.

Fruit of the Spirit - Visible Growth in Jesus Christ
"Fruit of the Spirit" is a biblical term that sums up the nine visible attributes of a true Christian life. Using the King James Version of Galatians 5:22-23, these attributes are: love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness and temperance. We learn from scripture that these are not individual "fruits" from which we pick and choose. Rather, the fruit of the Spirit is one ninefold "fruit" that characterizes all who truly walk in the Holy Spirit. Collectively, these are the fruits that all Christians should be producing in their new lives with Jesus Christ.

Fruit of the Spirit - The Nine Biblical Attributes
The fruit of the Spirit is a physical manifestation of a Christian's transformed life. In order to mature as believers, we should study and understand the attributes of the ninefold fruit:

Love - "And so we know and rely on the love God has for us. God is love. Whoever lives in love lives in God, and God in him" (1 John 4:16). Through Jesus Christ, our greatest goal is to do all things in love. "Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres. Love never fails" (1 Corinthians 13:4-8).

Joy - "The joy of the Lord is your strength" (Nehemiah 8:10). "Let us fix our eyes on Jesus, the author and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy set before him endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God" (Hebrews 12:2).

Peace - "Therefore, since we have been justified through faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ" (Romans 5:1). "May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you trust in him, so that you may overflow with hope by the power of the Holy Spirit" (Romans 15:13).

Longsuffering (patience) -- We are "strengthened with all might, according to his glorious power, unto all patience and longsuffering with joyfulness" (Colossians 1:11). "With all lowliness and meekness, with longsuffering, forbearing one another in love" (Ephesians 4:2).

Gentleness (kindness) -- We should live "in purity, understanding, patience and kindness; in the Holy Spirit and in sincere love; in truthful speech and in the power of God; with weapons of righteousness in the right hand and in the left" (2 Corinthians 6:6-7).

Goodness - "Wherefore also we pray always for you, that our God would count you worthy of this calling, and fulfill all the good pleasure of his goodness, and the work of faith with power" (2 Thessalonians 1:11). "For the fruit of the Spirit is in all goodness and righteousness and truth" (Ephesians 5:9).

Faith (faithfulness) - "O Lord, thou art my God; I will exalt thee, I will praise thy name; for thou hast done wonderful things; thy counsels of old are faithfulness and truth" (Isaiah 25:1). "I pray that out of his glorious riches he may strengthen you with power through his Spirit in your inner being, so that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith" (Ephesians 3:16-17).

Meekness - "Brethren, if a man be overtaken in a fault, ye which are spiritual, restore such an one in the spirit of meekness; considering thyself, lest thou also be tempted" (Galatians 6:1). "With all lowliness and meekness, with longsuffering, forbearing one another in love" (Ephesians 4:2).

Temperance (self-control) - "But also for this very reason, giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue, to virtue knowledge, to knowledge self-control, to self-control perseverance, to perseverance godliness, to godliness brotherly kindness, and to brotherly kindness love" (2 Peter 1:5-7).

Fruit of the Spirit - A Devotional for All Christians
The fruit of the Spirit is a wonderful study for Christians at any level of spiritual maturity. We hope this website provides a thought-provoking devotional and a springboard for growth.

above portion from Fruit Of The Spirit

NIV Application Commentary

Paul’s listing of the “fruit of the Spirit” does not seem to have any particular order, though some have proposed an order. J. R. W. Stott sees in these nine virtues three groups of three: attitudes to God, others, and self, while J. B. Lightfoot sees dispositions of the mind, qualities governing human relations, and principles of conduct. We do need to comment on the terms fruit and love, but we are not able to spend time with each word.

Paul describes “flesh” under the term works, while he sees the Spirit’s work as “fruit.” The former is plural while the latter is singular. Is there anything significant in the change of terms or the change of number? Above all, it must be observed that works has been a term of negative associations in Galatians and that Paul probably delighted in associating the “works” of the flesh with the “works of the law” (2:16; 3:2, 5, 10). The change of terms to “fruit” evokes a different image: from one of human responsibility to one of divine enablement. The image of fruit has a certain sense of passivity to it; it is the Spirit of God who produces such things, and they grow in the life of the Christian.

However, while this may be one reason for the change of terms, it is also clear that Paul sees evil as having fruit (6:8) and thinks that the Christian is responsible to let the Spirit be operative in his or her life. Note that Paul shoulders the responsibility of the Spirit’s fruit onto the Christian: “have crucified their flesh” (v. 24), “let us keep in step” (v. 25), and “let us not become conceited” (v. 26)—not to mention verses 13, 16, and 18. It is possible that the unity of the fruit is emphasized in the singular while the chaotic multitude of sins of the flesh is represented in a plural noun. On the other hand, “fruit” can be seen as a collective plural; if so, there is nothing significant in the change to a singular.

While “love” is not the only “fruit” of the Spirit, it is the most important to Paul (cf. vv. 6, 13–14; also Rom. 5:5; 1 Cor. 13; Col. 3:14). It summarizes the demand of God’s law (Gal. 5:14), endures forever (1 Cor 13:13), and unites all the virtues of life (Col. 3:14). Fundamental to Paul’s view, however, is that love comes from God’s Spirit (cf. Rom. 5:5). Moreover, as we look over this list, we observe the reverse of the list of the works of the flesh. Whereas the flesh destroys fellowship; here the Spirit creates fellowship, unity, and holiness.

As if summarizing his whole point, Paul says that (1) those who have surrendered themselves to Jesus Christ “have crucified the flesh” and so should not be involved in the works of the flesh (v. 24); (2) those who have been given God’s life by the Spirit and Christ (cf. 2:20; Rom 8:9–11) should march according to the Spirit’s orders (Gal 5:25); and (3) those who live in the freedom of the Spirit should not be conceited and so fight with one another (v. 26). Once again, we end up with Paul’s emphasis in this context: Galatian factionalism.
John 15: 5 "I am the vine; you are the branches. If you remain in me and I in you, you will bear much fruit; apart from me you can do nothing.
There are many fruits of the spirit in and through you!
 
Active
I've corrected the title.
I guess I just noticed that the NIV commentary you posted seems to disagree with what I had always heard. I hadn't heard that before. The Greek word there is definitely singular though. I am not a Greek Scholar, so I honestly don't know what exactly that means.

Blessings,

Travis
 
Loyal
The reference in Galatians mentions 9 fruit, but the following verse speaks of 12 from the tree of Life:

"In the midst of the street of it, and on either side of the river, was there the tree of life, which bare twelve manner of fruits, and yielded her fruit every month: and the leaves of the tree were for the healing of the nations." Rev 22:2

If we search through the scriptures are we likely to find more than nine?
 
Active
The reference in Galatians mentions 9 fruit, but the following verse speaks of 12 from the tree of Life:

"In the midst of the street of it, and on either side of the river, was there the tree of life, which bare twelve manner of fruits, and yielded her fruit every month: and the leaves of the tree were for the healing of the nations." Rev 22:2

If we search through the scriptures are we likely to find more than nine?
That is true, fruit is mentioned in different places, in different contexts. I think the point regarding the fruit of the spirit in Galatians has to do with the unity of the different facets of that one fruit. Namely, the fruit of the Holy Spirit.

Blessings,

Travis
 

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