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Are all of the books of the Bible chronologically correct, and if not which ones aren't and why not?
 
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The books of the Bible aren't arranged in strict chronological order. The Old Testament is divided into Law, History, Wisdom, major prophets, minor prophets.

The New Testament is 4 gospels, book of Acts, letters of Paul, letters of other apostles, Book of Revelation.
 
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miker88
I'm not referring to one book to other books, my question is within each book, are they chronologically correct according to chapter and verse?
 
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@miker88 -- the original manuscripts were not arranged in chapter and verse as we have in English. But we Do have as close to word by word as is possible through the process of translating from one language to another. The originals were writing that went on and on the way writing / reading was in those days. The English language follows rules of grammar. Periods, commas, paragraphs differently than Spanish does. But nothing is being left out in either language. In fact -- God's Word tells us to not add to or subtract From what is written in it.

Translators have to know both languages in order To translate as close as possible from the original Greek / Hebrew To another language.

but no one has gotten into any of the books and re-arranged the verses or chapters. Any more than a person could take Shakespear and re-arrange portions of it while translating it to make it sound better.
 
Member
Are all of the books of the Bible chronologically correct, and if not which ones aren't and why not?
As far as I know the only book that is in chronological order is the Gospel of Luke.

Inasmuch as many have taken in hand to set in order a narrative of those things which have been fulfilled1 among us,
2 just as those who from the beginning were eyewitnesses and ministers of the word delivered them to us,
3 it seemed good to me also, having had perfect understanding of all things from the very first, to write to you an orderly account, most excellent Theophilus, (Lk. 1:1-3 NKJ)


There may be other books that are but I'm not aware of them. Your best bet would probably be to look at a chronological Bible.
 
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Well -- the book of Acts is a continuation of the book of Luke, yes.

Scripture -- all of it -- was inspired by God through the Holy Spirit to people who wrote exactly what the Holy Spirit told them to. Inspiration of Scripture. So, yes, of course they are chronologically correct. Any narrative is written as it happened.
How could it Not be. Maybe the book of Proverbs seems disconnected at times -- but it's exactly what God wants us to read and believe and learn from / practice.

The point is that God's Word is true, correct in all it says. 2 Timothy 3: 14 - 16
 
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Most books of the narrative books of the bible are chronological order. But there are exceptions. For example, John puts Jesus' cleansing of the Temple right at the beginning (chapter 2). Wheras the other gospel writers have the event right before he is executed.

Curious why you're asking the question
 
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Curious why you're asking the question
I realize that to be considered a Christian you have to believe that "Adam" of Gen. Ch.2 is the same as "Man" in Genesis Ch1, and I will admit that both words are translated from the same Hebrew word but that's the end of the similarities between the two chapters.
In Chapter 1, we have man being made last on the earth – but in chapter 2 Adam is made first.
In chapter 1 we have male and female being made at the same time- and in Ch 2 we have Eve being made after Adam and even after the animals.
In chapter 1 man is given every tree to eat from,- but in chapter 2 Adam has every tree except ONE to eat from.
In chapter 1 we have water and creatures in the water being made- and of chapter 2 there is no mention of water creatures.
Earth in chapter 1 is not the same as the garden of Eden.
These are just some of the differences between the two chapters, but there is more.
 
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Yep. They are different accounts and they don't fit together in a neat scientific package. So what?
 
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@miker88 -- I understand now why you're confused. Genesis 1 starts out with generalities and then progresses into the same thing in more specifics.

We Are told specifically in Genesis 1:1 that 'in the beginning God created ' -- and then the passage continues to tell what shape it Was in and how we Did get everything that we now have. Where, when and how.

Genesis 2:4 and Then proceeds with more information as to How the man was formed, etc. So -- gradually -- over the next few chapters we get more and more information to make the 'puzzle' more complete.

@Hekuran -- well -- it Does matter in respect to our accepting God's Word as He has chosen to give it to us. It's simply the Hebrew language's way of expressing information.

A person Can choose to pick apart God's Word and accept it only on Our terms of understanding OR we Can acknowledge God's Word as being God's Word -- always truthful. Well -- years ago Lee Strobel set out to prove that Jesus Christ didn't actually die so that He didn't actually have to rise again. The experts showed him the facts.

True science has always agreed with Scripture. Researchers who take Bible seriously have proven Bible / Scripture to be scientifically accurate.

Maybe the term 'true' science isn't a good term to use. It suggests that there is 'false' science. Medical research is showing that there is Always more that can be learned -- researchers.

People All have their biases. a comment has been made that 'science' has no biases -- experimentation is done and results are recorded. But 'we' all know that there is a mainstream in science that is to be accepted. And That is the Theory of evolution. People are expected to accept that which the experts in many fields of science tell us happened. The Bible is pretty much laughed at. And a Bible timeline -- well-- 'we' tend to adjust it to Our understanding of how everything Must have happened. And Lots of people go with theistic evolution. That God started the process and then let nature take its course. Since God was powerful enough to get 'it' started -- what happened To all the power. Do we think that that one week of creation depleated God's supply of power?! I certainly hope Not -- because He Also showed us His power in bringing people back to life -- Like Jesus Christ dying and rising again bodily. The dividing of the Red Sea for instance.
All the ways He showed His power to Pharoah when God used Moses and Aaron to deliver His people out of their bondage.

All people Do have their personal biases. Evolutionists 'adjust' their findings to support a very old earth.

Are 'we' going to try to adjust God's omnipotence?
 
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Hi all,
In my experience I believe the Bible is one big parable
With Love Wnl


Look at Mark 4:1 and 2 " And again , He began to teach by the sea. And a great multitude was gathered to Him so that He got into a boat and sat in it on the sea; and the whole multitude was on the land facing the sea. vs 2 Then He taught them many things by parables, and said to them in His teaching." He proceeded to share about the sower and the seed. He was using earthly example to teach heavenly truths.

It would depend on how you define a parable.

There are various types/ kinds of literature In the Bible // history / prophesy / poetry and I'm thinking there is another type that I can't think of. Some of the subjects in the Gospels are taught in the form of parables.

There Are those who have trouble accepting that some of the situations in the Old Testament actually Did happen. Daniel and the lions den, for instance. The three men in the fiery furnace surviving. Shadrach, Mechak and Abednego.

That they are good 'stories' with good moral teachings. That is how some people view them.

But -- as 'we' know -- they really did happen. And we Do learn some powerful truths from them.

:)
 
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Look at Mark 4:1 and 2 " And again , He began to teach by the sea. And a great multitude was gathered to Him so that He got into a boat and sat in it on the sea; and the whole multitude was on the land facing the sea. vs 2 Then He taught them many things by parables, and said to them in His teaching." He proceeded to share about the sower and the seed. He was using earthly example to teach heavenly truths.

It would depend on how you define a parable.

There are various types/ kinds of literature In the Bible // history / prophesy / poetry and I'm thinking there is another type that I can't think of. Some of the subjects in the Gospels are taught in the form of parables.

There Are those who have trouble accepting that some of the situations in the Old Testament actually Did happen. Daniel and the lions den, for instance. The three men in the fiery furnace surviving. Shadrach, Mechak and Abednego.

That they are good 'stories' with good moral teachings. That is how some people view them.

But -- as 'we' know -- they really did happen. And we Do learn some powerful truths from them.

:)
Hi Sue,

Do you consider the original Greek texts and the English translation of those Greek texts as equal in validity?
 
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Yes, I would. and that would apply to the Hebrew texts as well. Over the years, translators have taken great effort to make sure that 'we' can have God's Word in our own languages.

No two languages have the same alphabet -- which means that there are some words that Won't translate into another language. And translators deal with figures of speech in other languages as well. So there's a lot of studying and prayer , etc. that goes into the translating process.
 
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Yes, I would. and that would apply to the Hebrew texts as well. Over the years, translators have taken great effort to make sure that 'we' can have God's Word in our own languages.

No two languages have the same alphabet -- which means that there are some words that Won't translate into another language. And translators deal with figures of speech in other languages as well. So there's a lot of studying and prayer , etc. that goes into the translating process.
What if the English language didn't have a specific word like the Greek does? Then the translators chose a different word, ( through no fault of their own) and it changed something very important in God's word. Would that be considered adding or taking something away from the original Greek word of God in your understanding?
 
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Staff Member
Hi all,
In my experience I believe the Bible is one big parable
With Love Wnl
Dear Wnl,
It may be for some a story unlike any other, which it is, explaining moral and spiritual lessons above all others, which it does.
Yet, as Sister Sue stated that the unbeliever may very well see it as a parable, but for the Believer it is so much more!!!

For we have not followed cunningly devised fables, when we made known unto you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but were eyewitnesses of his majesty. 2 Peter 1:16 KJV

And after six days Jesus taketh Peter, James, and John his brother, and bringeth them up into an high mountain apart, 2 And was transfigured before them: and his face did shine as the sun, and his raiment was white as the light. Matthew 17:1-2

And his raiment became shining, exceeding white as snow; so as no fuller on earth can white them. Mark 9:3 KJV

And as he prayed, the fashion of his countenance was altered, and his raiment [was] white [and] glistering. ... 32 But Peter and they that were with him were heavy with sleep: and when they were awake, they saw his glory, and the two men that stood with him. Luke 9:29,32 KJV

My emphasis in bold in the above verses.

Had to share this with you.

With the Love of Christ Jesus.
YBIC
Nick
<><
 
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What if the English language didn't have a specific word like the Greek does? Then the translators chose a different word, ( through no fault of their own) and it changed something very important in God's word. Would that be considered adding or taking something away from the original Greek word of God in your understanding?

A person could do a lot of 'what if's' -- my sister and brother-in-law have been missionaries to Brazil for their entire lives -- in their retirement they are doing translation work on college level for believers in a couple of different Brazilian churches -- to train them in the ministry. My sister does the grammar part and my brother-in-law the graphics. They translate from English to Brazilian Portugeese. And I started learning Spanish a few years ago and I've helped people learning English as their 2nd language. And , as has been commented on -- each language has it's own alphabet -- which means that there are some words / sounds that Are different and that won't exist in the other language.

The sentence structure will probably be a bit different -- but the thought is translated accurately.

A translator is going to want to get the closest possible interpretation from one language to the other.-- especially when it comes to helping people in another language learning about God / the Gospel unto salvation. Their / Our eternal life depends on that.

And there have been people who simply don't like what the Bible says Period. And the excuse is that the translators messed up -- so -- they go back To the original and find out it says the same thing.

Taking away From or adding To Scripture would be belief systems that add the thoughts of a particular church leader in addition To God's Word.

Or those who would disregard various passages because they don't like what they say.

You might want to compare the Spanish alphabet with the English alphabet -- Spanish is very common in some states -- Texas for one since that's where I'm from. Most every store is bi-lingual. The Spanish sentence structure is a bit different -- but not that hard to understand.

When reading God's Word -- context is the main thing. Lifting a word or verse Out of it's intended context can mess up it's intended meaning and that can change something very important in God's Word -- this is what you commented on.

We have to place our faith in God's Word being God's Word. And, in turn, place our faith Also in the ability of those who translated it from the original Greek / Hebrew and some Armaic -- to Latin to whatever other language it's gone into that it's been done as accurately as possible.

The message of salvation is the main theme Of God's Word. The fact that Jesus Christ is the Son of God -- the death, burial and bodily resurrection was done for all of us to take care of our sins. And that nothing we can do on our own will help in our salvation. Jesus Christ did it all at Calvary -- on the cross -- His shed blood. That a future heaven and hell are in everyone's future. We're told the way to stay Out of hell and be able to be in heaven. For eternity. Each person either accepts salvation or rejects it on a personal basis. :)

I'm one of those people who can be asked a simple question and get a 'sermon' as a response. :)
 
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A person could do a lot of 'what if's' -- my sister and brother-in-law have been missionaries to Brazil for their entire lives -- in their retirement they are doing translation work on college level for believers in a couple of different Brazilian churches -- to train them in the ministry. My sister does the grammar part and my brother-in-law the graphics. They translate from English to Brazilian Portugeese. And I started learning Spanish a few years ago and I've helped people learning English as their 2nd language. And , as has been commented on -- each language has it's own alphabet -- which means that there are some words / sounds that Are different and that won't exist in the other language.

The sentence structure will probably be a bit different -- but the thought is translated accurately.

A translator is going to want to get the closest possible interpretation from one language to the other.-- especially when it comes to helping people in another language learning about God / the Gospel unto salvation. Their / Our eternal life depends on that.

And there have been people who simply don't like what the Bible says Period. And the excuse is that the translators messed up -- so -- they go back To the original and find out it says the same thing.

Taking away From or adding To Scripture would be belief systems that add the thoughts of a particular church leader in addition To God's Word.

Or those who would disregard various passages because they don't like what they say.

You might was to compare the Spanish alphabet with the English alphabet -- Spanish is very common in some states -- Texas for one since that's where I'm from. Most every store is bi-lingual. The Spanish sentence structure is a bit different -- but not that hard to understand.

When reading God's Word -- context is the main thing. Lifting a word or verse Out of it's intended context can mess up it's intended meaning and that can change something very important in God's Word -- this is what you commented on.

We have to place our faith in God's Word being God's Word. And, in turn, place our faith Also in the ability of those who translated it from the original Greek / Hebrew and some Armaic -- to Latin to whatever other language it's gone into that it's been done as accurately as possible.

The message of salvation is the main theme Of God's Word. The fact that Jesus Christ is the Son of God -- the death, burial and bodily resurrection was done for all of us to take care of our sins. And that nothing we can do on our own will help in our salvation. Jesus Christ did it all at Calvary -- on the cross -- His shed blood. That a future heaven and hell are in everyone's future. We're told the way to stay Out of hell and be able to be in heaven. For eternity. Each person either accepts salvation or rejects it on a personal basis. :)

I'm one of those people who can be asked a simple question and get a 'sermon' as a response. :)
That's okay I appreciate the response.

Let's go to the next step and take the " what if " out of the equation and put the problem on the table with some of my understanding.

First, have you gotten into any Greek word learning?
 
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@Faither -- I'm curious -- are you going any where particular with this subject of translating Scripture?

And, no I've not gotten into Greek word learning -- but I Do have a Strong's concordance. The Greek / Hebrew words and their meanings. I've used it several times in the process of being on various Forums.

Are you by chance a pastor? Or simply another lay person who likes to study? Just curious.
 

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