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  1. #1
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    Does God admit he made a mistake in Genesis 6:5-7?

    5And God saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually.

    6And it repented the LORD that he had made man on the earth, and it grieved him at his heart. 7And the LORD said, I will destroy man whom I have created from the face of the earth; both man, and beast, and the creeping thing, and the fowls of the air; for it repenteth me that I have made them.

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    This repentance was a change of mind in the way He would deal with man. That was admission of error but rather a response to man's heart and deed.

    From the Vines Expository Dictionary of the Old Testament:
    Repent

    nacham (H5162), "to repent, comfort." Nacham apparently means "to repent" about 40 times and "to comfort" about 65 times in the Old Testament. Scholars assert several views in trying to ascertain the meaning of nacham by connecting the word to a change of the heart or disposition, a change of mind, a change of purpose, or an emphasis upon the change of one's conduct.
    Most uses of the term in the Old Testament are connected with God's repentance: "...It repented the Lord that he had made man..." (Gen_6:6); "And the Lord repented [NASB, "changed his mind"] of the evil which he thought to do unto his people" (Exo_32:14, KJV). Sometimes the Lord "repented" of the discipline He had planned to carry ou
    t concerning His
    Psa 62:5 My soul, wait thou only upon God; for my expectation is from him.

  3. #3
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    Can an unchanging God change his mind?

  4. #4
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    Originally Posted by Boanerges View Post
    This repentance was a change of mind in the way He would deal with man. That was admission of error but rather a response to man's heart and deed.

    From the Vines Expository Dictionary of the Old Testament:
    Repent

    nacham (H5162), "to repent, comfort." Nacham apparently means "to repent" about 40 times and "to comfort" about 65 times in the Old Testament. Scholars assert several views in trying to ascertain the meaning of nacham by connecting the word to a change of the heart or disposition, a change of mind, a change of purpose, or an emphasis upon the change of one's conduct.
    Most uses of the term in the Old Testament are connected with God's repentance: "...It repented the Lord that he had made man..." (Gen_6:6); "And the Lord repented [NASB, "changed his mind"] of the evil which he thought to do unto his people" (Exo_32:14, KJV). Sometimes the Lord "repented" of the discipline He had planned to carry ou
    t concerning His
    Larry, I have to respectfully disagree. I do not believe it was a change of mind at all. In fact, I think it is a perfect display of God's love that ultimately leads to Christ. For instance, I do not believe God took joy in sending His Son to die on the cross nor do I believe He wished He could have taken it all back once it happened. However, I believe it still grieved Him at the same time. It was His plan but I do not believe He took joy in it despite this fact. It actually had to happen as did the events in the verses originally posted.

    Have you ever stopped to think that Jesus came from the bloodline he did because of the flood? They were not 2 separate events spanned over thousands of years. The flood was merely setting the stage for the biggest event of all which was the birth of our Lord and Savior.

    I believe it grieved God to see how it was all playing out but I do not believe He changed His mind at all. His sovereign plan was moving forward while His heart ached at the various things that were taking place in the meantime all the way up to the aching heart during the death of His Son.

  5. #5
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    Originally Posted by HappySoul View Post
    Can an unchanging God change his mind?
    Yes. We are made in His image and we change our mind all the time. Just a quick read of the Old Testament showed God offered Israel a choice between blessing and cursing; life and death. Both of these were tested on a regular basis and the basis of the outcome was reflected in their everyday choices.

    A review of the Vines Expository Dictionary of the Old Testament will give one a full "flavor" of the meaning of "repent" in the old covenant times:


    From the Vines Expository Dictionary of the Old Testament:
    Repent

    nacham (H5162), "to repent, comfort." Nacham apparently means "to repent" about 40 times and "to comfort" about 65 times in the Old Testament. Scholars assert several views in trying to ascertain the meaning of nacham by connecting the word to a change of the heart or disposition, a change of mind, a change of purpose, or an emphasis upon the change of one's conduct.
    Most uses of the term in the Old Testament are connected with God's repentance: "...It repented the Lord that he had made man..." (Gen_6:6); "And the Lord repented [NASB, "changed his mind"] of the evil which he thought to do unto his people" (Exo_32:14, KJV). Sometimes the Lord "repented" of the discipline He had planned to carry out concerning His people: "If that nation, against whom I have pronounced, turn from their evil, I will repent of the evil that I thought to do unto them" (Jer_18:8); "If it do evil in my sight, that it obey not my voice, then I will repent of the good..." (Jer_18:10); "And rend your heart, and not your garments, and turn unto the Lord your God: for he is gracious and merciful, slow to anger...and repenteth him of evil" (Joe_2:13). In other instances, the Lord changed His mind; obviously, He changed when man changed to make the right choices, but He could not change His attitude toward evil when man continued on the wrong course. As God changed His actions, He always remained faithful to His own righteousness.
    In some situations, God was weary of"repenting" (Jer_15:6), suggesting that there might be a point beyond which He had no choice but to implement His discipline. An instance of this action was in Samuel's word to Saul, that God took the kingdom from Israel's first king and intended to give it to another; Samuel declared, "And also the Strength of Israel will not lie nor repent; for he is not a man, that he should repent" (NASB, "change His mind"; 1Sa_15:29).
    God usually changed His mind and "repented" of His actions because of man's intercession and repentance of his evil deeds. Moses pleaded with God as the intercessor for Israel: "Turn from thy fierce wrath, and repent of this evil against thy people" (Exo_32:12). The Lord did that when He "...repented [changed His mind] of the evil which he thought to do unto his people" (Exo_32:14). As God's prophet preached to Nineveh, "...God saw their works, that they turned from their evil way; and God repented of the evil, that he had said that he would do unto them..." (Jon_3:10). In such instances, God "repented," or changed His mind, to bring about a change of plan. Again, however, God remained faithful to His absolutes of righteousness in His relation to and with man.
    Other passages refer to a change (or lack of it) in man's attitude. When man did not "repent" of his wickedness, he chose rebellion (Jer_8:6). In the eschatological sense, when Ephraim (as a representative of the northern branch of Israel) will "repent" (Jer_31:19), God then will have mercy (Jer_31:20).
    Man also expressed repentance to other men. Benjamin suffered greatly from the crime of immorality (Judges 19-20): "And the children of Israel [eleven tribes] repented them from Benjamin their brother, and said, There is one tribe cut off from Israel this day" (Jdg_21:6; cf. Jdg_21:15).
    Nacham may also mean "to comfort." The refugees in Babylon would be "comforted" when survivors arrived from Jerusalem (Eze_14:23); the connection between "comfort" and "repent" here resulted from the calamity God brought upon Jerusalem as a testimony to the truth of His Word. David "comforted" Bathsheba after the death of her child born in sin (2Sa_12:24); this probably indicates his repentance of what had happened in their indiscretion.
    On the other hand, the word was used in the human sense of "comfort." Job asked his three companions, "How then comfort ye me in vain, seeing in your answers there remaineth falsehood?" (Job_21:34; he meant that their attitude seemed cruel and unfeeling). The psalmist looked to God for "comfort": "Thou shalt increase my greatness, and comfort me on every side" (Psa_71:21). In an eschatological sense, God indicated that He would "comfort" Jerusalem with the restoration of Israel, as a mother comforts her offspring (Isa_66:13).
    Last edited by Boanerges; 01-08-11 at 10:45 AM. Reason: finish thought
    Psa 62:5 My soul, wait thou only upon God; for my expectation is from him.

  6. #6
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    Originally Posted by rojoloco View Post
    Larry, I have to respectfully disagree. I do not believe it was a change of mind at all. In fact, I think it is a perfect display of God's love that ultimately leads to Christ. For instance, I do not believe God took joy in sending His Son to die on the cross nor do I believe He wished He could have taken it all back once it happened. However, I believe it still grieved Him at the same time. It was His plan but I do not believe He took joy in it despite this fact. It actually had to happen as did the events in the verses originally posted.

    Have you ever stopped to think that Jesus came from the bloodline he did because of the flood? They were not 2 separate events spanned over thousands of years. The flood was merely setting the stage for the biggest event of all which was the birth of our Lord and Savior.

    I believe it grieved God to see how it was all playing out but I do not believe He changed His mind at all. His sovereign plan was moving forward while His heart ached at the various things that were taking place in the meantime all the way up to the aching heart during the death of His Son.
    Our difference in opinion here goes back to God's foreknowledge. He wasn't happy but neither was He surprised and He always had a plan thus the "Lamb slain from the foundation of the world" reference.
    Your strict views on predestination may keep us from agreeing on much but I will be glad to hug your neck inside heavens gate my friend.
    Psa 62:5 My soul, wait thou only upon God; for my expectation is from him.

  7. #7
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    Originally Posted by HappySoul View Post
    5And God saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually.

    6And it repented the LORD that he had made man on the earth, and it grieved him at his heart. 7And the LORD said, I will destroy man whom I have created from the face of the earth; both man, and beast, and the creeping thing, and the fowls of the air; for it repenteth me that I have made them.

    I do not see it as being a mistake. God does not make mistakes.
    When the bible says that it repented the LORD that he had made man, God is sorry that he created us for our wicked way, however it was man that did wrong, not God. Many times we feel sorry about things, and regret the way it turns out, but it does not mean that we made a mistake in the process.
    Much Love In Christ: For Whom can Love Like My Lord?:

  8. #8
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    GE 6:5 The LORD saw how great man's wickedness on the earth had become, and that every inclination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil all the time. 6 The LORD was grieved that he had made man on the earth, and his heart was filled with pain.
    I don't think the Bible is saying here the Lord made a mistake but had an emotional reaction to the wickedness and evil that was happening on the Earth. I'm sure the Lord was not surprised nor was the Lord sorry he created us.

    GE 1:31 God saw all that he had made, and it was very good. And there was evening, and there was morning--the sixth day.
    2TH 2:13 But we ought always to thank God for you, brothers loved by the Lord, because from the beginning God chose you to be saved through the sanctifying work of the Spirit and through belief in the truth. 14 He called you to this through our gospel, that you might share in the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ.
    God loved us from the very beginning. God planned to save mankind even before we sinned.

    God may have been grieved but certainly HE had no regrets.

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    It is really hard for me to consider the possibility that God ever makes a mistake. To think that He could make a mistake would mean that actually He cannot be trusted. How many times does Jesus tell us to trust Him? Over and over again: Fear not.

    The problem was that the people made a mistake, or many mistakes. It made God sad to see how His lovely creation had been corrupted, and to see how far the people had strayed from Him. God is allowed to be sad, but personally I believe that He knew it was going to happen from the beginning. Even if He knew it would happen, it still was grievous to behold when it actually did happen.

    Part of my belief system is that God cannot make a mistake. Everything that happens is by His design, even things that we may consider a mistake. It has been my experience that whenever something does not go "right" (in my estimation), it ends up that God uses the "mistake" or "problem" to get a better result than there would have been without the "mistake". Maybe the "mistake" really wasn't a mistake after all, but we just didn't know what God's real will was?

    Question: was what God made still "very good" after the fall? That is some food for thought.

  10. #10
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    Originally Posted by HappySoul View Post
    5And God saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually.

    6And it repented the LORD that he had made man on the earth, and it grieved him at his heart. 7And the LORD said, I will destroy man whom I have created from the face of the earth; both man, and beast, and the creeping thing, and the fowls of the air; for it repenteth me that I have made them.

    God can't make a mistake because everything that happens was planned by him before creation. This message was planned by him and now it's taking place in the alotted time.

    Think of it this way. God saw the movie while he was making plans to produce the movie.

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